Timesizing® Associates - Homepage

hopes/dooms du jour,
October, 2011

[Commentary] ©2011 Phil Hyde, The Timesizing Wire, Harvard Sq PO Box 117, Cambridge MA 02238 USA (617) 623-8080 - HOMEPAGE


    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Small business payrolls increase 30000 in October, 10/30 Reuters.com
    WASHINGTON, D.C. - US small businesses added fewer jobs in October than in the previous month and reduced working hours for employees, a survey showed on Sunday... The average work week for small business fell 0.2% to 24.5 hours... - see whole article under today's date.
    [Shorter hours is happening anyway, but not the best way.]
  2. The Financial World Today: What's Important (10/30/2011) Walmart Cuts Hours, Nook Trouble, 10/30 24/7 Wall St. via 247wallst.com
    NEW YORK, N.Y. - Walmart will begin to cut hours at some of its 24-hour stores, a sign of flagging traffic as the holiday retail period begins. Walmart has been in the process of rebuilding its domestic operations of years as people move to Target and Amazon.com... - see whole article under today's date.
    [So even the monstrous octopus, major killer of small local businesses, is being forced to cut hours.]
  3. Dour Sarkozy prepares France for deep cuts — He dismissed Socialist keystones — 35-hour workweek and retirement age of 60, as untenable in 'new reality', 10/30 NYT via STLtoday.com
    PARIS, France • ...And while he did not directly take aim at his main opponent, the Socialist Francois Hollande, he dismissed keystones of past Socialist governments, including the 35-hour workweek and a minimum retirement age of 60, as untenable vestiges of a pre-crisis era... - see whole article under today's date.
    [Mandatory retirement at any arbitrary age is an unsustainable blank check on society and a waste of skills and experience. But a fixed workweek at any level, ratcheted upward, against the background of ongoing introduction of worksaving technology, is also unsustainable, because it concentrates wages and spending power on ever fewer consumers and constantly weakens the markets for all the technology-multiplied products and services of the worksaving technology. Sarkozy's thinking is trapped inside the box, but as long as the French right isn't efficient enough to be looking for Single All-Sufficient Regulation, and as long as the French left is too selfish and unstrategic to focus their votes, as when they completely sabotaged themselves by failing to unite behind Jospin, France is going down - they're even too blind or arrogant to look nextdoor and copy Germany's successful Kurzarbeit (worksharing).]
  4. "Working Endless Hours is Not the Way Out of Today's Recession" Warns Independent Restaurant Marketing Coach Edmund Woo, 10/31 San Francisco Chronicle (press release)
    [And a Chinese restaurant coach should know! Sarkozy take notice!]
    GREENVILLE, N.C. - Many independent restaurateurs are drastically increasing the time they spend at their restaurants hoping to rescue their business. Despite the lure of potentially saving labor expense and knowing "things are being done their way", Edmund Woo, restaurant marketing coach and author of "The 5 Hour Restaurant Work Week: Work Less, Make More and Have a Life, too", believes independent restaurants need to carefully consider three factors before continuing on this self-destructive path... - see whole article under today's date.
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Saturday, October 29, 2011 while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think there has been a real recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - updating today from Café Corsé, 152 Montcalm, Îsle de Hull, QUÉBEC -

    growth-choking DOWNSIZING in the news (archives) - all reversible by switching to timesizing -

  • Whirlpool misses expectations and will cut jobs, AP via New York Times, B4.
    ...5,000 jobs, about 10% of its workforce in North America and Europe, because of soft demand and higher costs for materials...the world's biggest appliance maker...
    [And now it will have even softer demand...]

    A DELUGE OF DISABILITY & "disability" in the news (archives) - so-o-o unnecessary with the shorter workweeks of the timesizing program -
  • Towns can seek aid for busing homeless students, by Justin Rice jrice.globe@gmail.com, Boston Globe, B3.
    ...Statewide [Massachusetts], 1,410 families lived in motels in 33 cities or towns by Oct.11... Six communities host more than 100 families, including Danvers (117), which spent $145,140 transporting homeless students to other school districts last year... ...The program costs about $1 million annually in transportation costs and could cost as much as $5.3 million in educational costs...
  • Disability filings at rail system remain high, despite attention to abuses - A volume of applications that sets the Long Island Rail Road apart from other train operations, by Michael Grynbaum, New York Times, A15.
    More than half of the Long Island Rail Road workers who retired last year applied for federal disability benefits, a rate far higher than the national average...including the Metro-North Railroad, which is comparable in size..\..even as federal officials and prosecutors tried to stem a chronic pattern of abuse of the public benefits system by the railroad's retirees. Furthermore, nearly all of the claims - 95% over the past three years - continued to be approved by the Railroad Retirement Board, the federal agency that is the equivalent of the Social Security Administration for railroad workers....
    Eleven people were charged on Thursday in Federal District Court in Manhattan with a huge fraud scheme. Most were retirees from the railroad who, prosecutors said, collected tens of thousands of dollars a year after claiming they had disabling pain; they had been observed playing tennis or golf, bicycling up to 400 miles or doing aerobics for hours. Those charged included two doctors who ran "disability mills," producing false assessments for workers...

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • What the [Halloween] costumes reveal - A New York 'foreclosure mill' [Steven J. Baum] mocks those who lose their homes, op ed by Joe Nocera, New York Times, A17.
  • America's exploding pipe dream, op ed by Charles Blow, NYT, A17.
    ...We sold ourselves a pipe dream...that exploded like a pipe bomb when the already rich grabbed for all the gold...
    [The prevailing assumption that you can give any fraction of the money supply, however large, to any fraction of the population, however small, and still have sufficient volume and velocity of monetary circulation to satisfy the massive demand for sustainable investment is being daily dramatically disproved.]
    ...A report [was] released on Thursday by the Bertelsmann Stiftung foundation of Germany entitled "Social Justice in the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development - How do member states compare?"...
    [The once-great USA is fifth from the bottom (27th out of 31) just above Greece! The first five are all the Scandinavian countries starting with Iceland, the people who refused to bail out their or anyone else's bankers. And then come Norway, Denmark, Sweden and Finland. Canada is ninth after Netherlands, Switzerland and Luxembourg. Canada is actually right ahead of France. Then comes the Czech Republic of all places, and only then, New Zealand, Austria, German and Britain...]
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Easthampton mayoral candidates raise issues of Municipal Bldg workweek, road closure, civility, MassLive.com
    EASTHAMPTON, N.Y. - ...In 2009, Tautznik's move to close Friday and add an hour Monday through Thursday reduced weekly hours from 35 to 32, closed a $100,000 budget gap and saved two jobs, said the mayor... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. Few domestic companies opting for furloughs: vice premier, Central News Agency via eTaiwan News via taiwannews.com.tw
    TAIPEI, Taiwan - ...Noting that furlough schemes are introduced mainly to help companies save money and jobs or keep well-trained manpower, Chen said such programs should not be abused... - see whole article under today's date.
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Friday, October 28, 2011 while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think there has been a real recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - headlines in Cambridge, Mass. provided by *Porter Sq. Books - "One square above Harvard!" -

    tsunami of BANKRUPTCIES & CLOSINGS (archives) - staunched only by risky war or safe timesizing -

  • Harrisburg PA is having a yard sale - Wanna buy a stuffed buffalo? Wall Street Journal, A1.
    ...Two weeks ago, the city council filed for Chapter 9 bankruptcy protection. Harrisburg is the second U.S. city to have done so this year...
    [Central Falls RI was the culprit, and the first ever in Rhode Island.]

    A DELUGE OF DISABILITY & "disability" in the news (archives) - so-o-o unnecessary with the shorter workweeks of the timesizing program -
  • A congressional panel heard testimony about a cycle of dependency in which children in the Supplemental Security Income program eventually seek benefits as adults, Boston Globe, A1 pointer to B1.
    Children's SSI program examined - Research cites a cycle of dependency, by Patricia Wen, Boston Globe, B1 target article.
    WASHINGTON - Indigent children who grew up as part of a $10 billion federal disability program often do not fare well in early adulthood. Four out of 10 are highschool dropouts, and eight out of 10 are unemployed within five years of their 18th birthday, according to congressional testimony yesterday...
    [It's a huge mistake to get children mixed up with a program for disabled workers (which already has enough problems of its own) in a jurisdiction that has laws against child workers ("child labor laws").]

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • Fewer Americans moved last year than at any time since World War II, the Census said, the result of a housing bust and unemployment, Wall Street Journal, A1 news squib.
    Moving rate in US is at lowest ever tracked - Residents stuck amid struggle with economy, Boston Globe, A2.
    Mobility in the United States has reached its lowest point since World War II, with adults both young and old locked in place for financial reasons, Boston Globe, A1 pointer to A2.
    [Well, well, well. Here we have complete rebuttal for conventional economists who try to criticize German worksharing ("Kurz-arbeit") for producing a more rigid and less adaptible workforce. Now three great articles today -]
  • Worker costs rise - Don't expect salaries to, by Kelly Evans, WSJ, C1 - see whole article under today's date.
    [And so, don't expect consumer spending to - meaning there is absolutely no basis for economic recovery if James Livingston (two days ago) is right that consumer spending is key to growth (as Keynes said in 1936 and we called it demand-side economics. After it saved the economy and we started taking economic growth for granted, we started belittling demand-side economics and talking up supply-side economics alias Reaganomics, as if "if you produce it, it will sell". Well, we see how great THAT'S been working. It harks back to Say's Law, "markets always clear" - but that's no key to growth because they might clear at a loss or "clear" only like the Mayan temples at Tikal - by getting overgrown with jungle.]
  • Are companies responsible for creating jobs? by John Bussey, WSJ, B1 - see whole article under today's date.
    [They are if they do want customers and don't want taxes - to support a government that could do it (but governments, as we're seeing, usually do it too little too late except during world wars overseas).]
  • Flat tax fantasies - and the realities, op ed by Scott Lehigh, Boston Globe, A15.
    ...Keep your wits clear and your wallet close in this time of flat-tax infatuation. Tax-code flat-tery may sound beguiling, but as policy, the idea is a decided dud. - see whole article under today's date.
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Basalt, RFTA workers due for raises - Local governments look to reward employees with raises or bonuses after lean years, AspenTimes.com
    BASALT, Colo. - ...In addition to going through 2009, 2010 and 2011 without raises, town workers had to take three furlough days in 2008 and six furlough days in 2009... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. Airport strike is averted, ChinaDaily.com.cn
    HONG KONG, China - ...Alan Tang Ho-wai, another union leader, said the company was "sincere" this time round, while describing the past three sessions as "perfunctory." "We can now report that the problem of long working hours and overtime without adequate compensation has been satisfactorily resolved," he said.... Besides shorter hours and better working conditions, the ground crew had demanded a 20% hike in their basic salary, but any agreement on this has been put off to a later date... - see whole article under today's date.
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Thursday, October 27, 2011 while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think there has been a real recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - headlines in Cambridge, Mass. provided by *Porter Sq. Books - "One square above Harvard!" -

    growth-choking DOWNSIZING in the news (archives) - all reversible by switching to timesizing -

  • State budget cuts leaving courthouses overburdened nationwide, by Greg Bluestein, AP via Boston Globe, A9.
    ATLANTA, Ga. - ...Judges are delaying trials to cope with layoffs and strained staffing levels. ...An American Bar Assoc. report in August found that most states cut court funding 10-15% within the past three years. At least 26 states delayed filling open judgeships, while courts in 14 states were forced to lay off staff, the report said. The National District Attorneys Assoc. estimates that...scores of positions have been cut amid the economic downturn.... The cuts come as civil and criminal caseloads for many state and county systems have swelled. Maine had a 50% increase in civil cases during the last five years, in part because of foreclosures related to the nation's housing crisis, records show. Iowa's court system is struggling to recover from cuts in 2009 that forced officials to lay off 120 workers and eliminate 100 vacant positions. Staffing levels there are now lower than in 1987, while district court filings have increased 66%....
  • Haverhill, Salem MA - Lowe's stores closed, canceled - Chain drops plan at Salem-Lynn line,
    by Steven Rosenberg, Boston Globe, NO1.
    ...closing its Haverhill MA store and handing out pink slips to more than 100 employees there, while also walking away from a store it had proposed to build in Salem, where an estimated 125 jobs would have been created. ...The decision[s were] part of a companywide move to downsize in the stagnant economy. The Haverhill Lowe's was one of 20 the company decided to close, including three New Hampshire locations in Manchester, Hooksett, and Claremont. ...Because of the lagging economy, Lowe's will open only 10-15 stores in the U.S. next year and beyond, compared with the 30 it had projected...
  • iRobot layoffs include 44 in Mass., by Chris Reidy, Boston Globe, B8.
    Bedford's iRobot Corp...has laid off 8% of its workforce...because of anticipated cutbacks in government defense spending. All told, 55 employees were let go at company facilities in Mass., N.C. and Calif...
    [What should they be doing? Timesizing, not downsizing! - Instead of a dramatic/traumatic 8% workforce cut, iRobot should just be trimming 8% of their corporate workweek (38 1/2 minutes a day for everyone, including top executives), re-investing any overtime profits in overtime-targeted training & hiring, & keeping everyone together working, earning & doing 92% as much consumer spending as before.]
  • Netflix cuts 15 jobs on subscriber loss, Bloomberg via Boston Globe, B8.
    LOS ANGELES, Calif. - ...after losing 800,000 US subscribers in Q3 [after] a subscriber revolt over a price increase and the aborted plan to split.\.its mail-order and streaming businesses.... The shares fell 35% Monday after the company disclosed the defections....
    [Another stupid CEO, Reed Hastings. Our fave, when Boston Chicken changed its cute name and logo to nondescript Boston Market and ... went bankrupt.]
  • Music store chain decides to bow out, Boston Globe, B2.
    MANCHESTER, N.H. - Daddy's Junky Music, a small but beloved New Hampshire-based chain of music stores with shops across much of New England, has closed all its stores for good. "...Thank you for a wonderful 39 years."...
  • Carrier mergers, cuts mean a lot of gate changes at Logan [Airport, Boston], Boston Globe, B1 pointer to B5.

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • Facing hardship, jobless still say they have hope...- 7 in 10 fear benefits will expire before they get work, New York Time, A1.
  • Hub [=Boston] shoppers worried over economy,
    Boston Globe, B8.
  • BP was awarded the first drilling permit in the Gulf of Mexico since last year's Deepwater Horizon oil spill, Wall Street Journal, A1 pointer to A7.
  • Crony capitalism comes home - Why Occupy Wall Street has taken hold, op ed by Nicholas Kristof, NYT, A25.
    ...Capitalism is so successful an economic system partly because of an internal discipline that allows for loss and even bankruptcy. It’s the possibility of failure that creates the opportunity for triumph. Yet many of America’s major banks are too big to fail, so they can privatize profits while socializing risk.
    ["Privatize profits while socializing risk"? Doesn't Noam Chomsky have a little book out by this name or similar? Nice to see Chomsky's ideas in the mainstream media where they belong.]
    The upshot is that financial institutions boost leverage in search of supersize profits and bonuses. Banks pretend that risk is eliminated because it’s securitized. Rating agencies accept money to issue a [triple-A rating] that turns out to be meaningless. The system teeters, and then the taxpayer [gets dragged] in to bail bankers out. Where’s the accountability?
    [No accountability, no responsibility, no sustainability, no survivability. Minimum necessary modification of core economy design? Timesizing. Adjusting our time arrangements balances the center so we don't have to keep going around the rest of the economic edifice straightening more and more of the pictures.]
    It’s not just rabble-rousers at Occupy Wall Street who are seeking to put America’s capitalists on a more capitalist footing. “Structural change is necessary,” Paul Volcker, the former chairman of the Federal Reserve, said in an important speech last month that discussed many of these themes. He called for more curbs on big banks, possibly including trimming their size, and he warned that otherwise we’re on a path of “increasingly frequent, complex and dangerous financial breakdowns.”... Lawrence Katz, a Harvard economist, adds that some inequality is necessary to create incentives in a capitalist economy...
    [That's why Timesizing equalizes on a range, not on a point. A range has more flexibility, versatility, adaptability, survivability. The bottom of the range (underemployment, starting downward at the bottom of the workweek) is set by referendum. The top of the range (overtime starting upward at the top of the workweek) is defined dynamically by the bottom (the unemployment rate= UE). If UE is too high or rising, the workweek shortens - automatically, and overtime starts earlier each week, and triggers reinvestment in OT-targeted hiring (& training whenever needed).]
    ...but that “too much inequality can harm the efficient operation of the economy.” In particular, he says, excessive inequality can have two perverse consequences: first, the very wealthy lobby for favors, contracts and bailouts that distort markets; and, second, growing inequality undermines the ability of the poorest to invest in their own education. “These factors mean that high inequality can generate further high inequality and eventually poor economic growth,” Professor Katz said....
    So, yes, we face a threat to our capitalist system. But it’s not coming from half-naked anarchists manning the barricades at Occupy Wall Street protests. Rather, it comes from pinstriped apologists for a financial system that glides along without enough of the discipline of failure and that produces soaring inequality, socialist bank bailouts and unaccountable executives.
    It’s time to take the crony out of capitalism, right here at home.
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Des Moines Public Library cuts at a glance, DesMoinesRegister.com
    DES MOINES, Iowa - Moves to fill a two-year budget hole projected at $656,000 will come on top of cuts that have already resulted in fewer hours and smaller customer service staffs at Des Moines Public Library locations... Every effort has been made to cut hours at branches based on circulation, door count and borrower statistics, library officials report... - see whole article under today's date.
    [= cutting hours, not jobs. The libraries are the best at this.]
  2. Ministry reduces working hours of preschool teachers, SGGP via saigon-gpdaily.com
    HO CHI MINH CITY, Vietnam - The Ministry of Education and Training has rescheduled the working curriculum of preschool teachers... Teachers will work 42 weeks in a year, which will include 35 teaching weeks, 4 weeks for participating in fresh skill courses, 2 weeks for preparation of new academic year and one week for winding up of the academic term... - see whole article under today's date.
    [We welcome Vietnam to 1939 (42-hr workweek in US), now we've gone back to 1865 (60-hr workweeks) for the few who still have "full-time" jobs.]
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Wednesday, October 26, 2011 while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think there has been a real recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - headlines in Cambridge, Mass. provided by *Porter Sq. Books - "One square above Harvard!" -

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -

  • Markets recoil as European meeting is canceled, Boston Globe, B8.
    [Don't get your hopes up. This was only a meeting of finance ministers ahead of today's summit on their debt crisis.]
    Blue chip stocks slid 207 points or 1.7% to 11706.62 - Gold rose...,
    WSJ, A1 pointer to C4.
  • Vital signs - Americans' outlook became more downbeat in October - An index of consumer confidence fell to 39.8 [in Oct.] from 46.4 in September, WSJ, A1 graph caption.
  • Incomes for the top 1% if Americans nearly tripled from 1979 to 2007, far surpassing other groups, the CBO said,
    WSJ, A1 news squib.
    [Apparently the WSJ did not deem this worthy of further elaboration, despite the probability that it had something, everything, to do with the current "anemic recovery." NYT take -]
    New poll finds a deep distrust of government - Anxiety over economy - Concentration of wealth seen as key issue in a volatile time, NYT, A1.
    [Bravo! The NY Times is finally using the actionable term "concentration of wealth" for the useless term "income gap"! And the tighter the concentration of the wealth of the nation (the nation's money supply), the less money available to the 99% (270m) outside the top 1% (3m), and the lower the consumer spending (story below), the lower consumers' confidence, the slower the circulation of the currency, the weaker the economic dynamism (=growth potential), the deeper the real recession (picture it as a diagonally downward spiral getting steeper) and the harder for the media to spin the situation as any kind of recovery, such as "weak, slow, stumbling, anemic, jobless," etc. Furthermore (we include the following Truth under badnews cuz the hurdles are so high against its acceptance) -]
  • It's consumer spending, stupid - Business investment is not the key to growth,
    op ed by Rutgers history professor James Livingston, NYT, A25.
    [YES! This is an EXTREMELY important article and gives us the idea that we need to develop a talk for Lions Clubs and Rotaries titled, Two Word Problems, to highlight the fact that a couple of outdated values are currently sabotaging our future = (1) ecologists have self-destructively demonized "consumption" when it is absolutely necessary for economic sustainability and can be done on Bucky Fuller's basis of "doing more with less," and (2) everyone has lionized Hard Work meaning long hours (and everyone confuses Busyness with Importance), when sharing the vanishing yet-unrobotized employment by cutting the workweek is absolutely necessary for economic sustainability let alone growth.]
    ...This is, to put it mildly, a controversial claim..\.. As an economic historian who has been studying American capitalism for 35 years [5 years after the Big Watershed of 1970 when the grownup Postwar Babyboomers entered the job markets and restored the wage-pummeling labor surplus of the Great Depression], I'm going to let you in on the best-kept secret of the last century: private investment - that is, using business profits to increase productivity and output - doesn't actually drive economic growth. Consumer debt [we'd stick with the headline's "consumer spending"] and government spending [unnecessary if there's enough consumer spending] do. Private investment isn't even necessary to promote growth.... - see whole article under today's date.
    [Here's a conventionally trained economist - albeit an historical economist (always a little odd cuz based on actual facts, not just computer models like other types of economists) inching his way toward Worktime Economics. So consumer spending drives growth, and rising general wage levels drive consumer spending, and worldwar2 levels of perceived labor "shortages" drive wages, and workweek reduction is less wasteful than war in driving labor "shortages" and centrifuging the nation's income and wealth out to the hundreds of millions who actually want and need and have the time to SPEND it. And each exchange reinforces the value of the paper currency and provides the currency with greater resistance to inflation or deflation. Printing more money and directing it toward a tiny population who already have the most of it does absolutely zero for economic stability let alone growth.]
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Ash Grove Cement again furloughing workers in Inkom, Boston.com
    POCATELLO, Idaho—...The company plans to furlough workers at the Inkom plant beginning on Dec.5. It is the third consecutive year the cement company has cut production over the winter months. The furloughs at six plants nationwide affect 200 workers, including about two dozen in Inkom, Idaho... - see whole article under today's date.
    [Sounds like they really don't have a steady Inkom, LOL.]
  2. BESPA Contract, WJHG-TV via wjhg.com
    PANAMA CITY, Fla. - ...The contract includes three furlough days for Bay Education Support Personnel Association employees which will match the furloughs that administrators and teachers have already to take... - see whole article under today's date.
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Tuesday, October 25, 2011 while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think there has been a real recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - headlines in Cambridge, Mass. provided by *Porter Sq. Books - "One square above Harvard!" -

    looting- and layoff-triggering MERGERS in the news (archives) -
    Mergers&acquisitions (M&As) provide a last resort for incompetent CEOs & a highway to monopoly - Management's
    economy-shrinking merger skills need replacement by economy-growing workspreading skills -
    Buy instead of build market share? See 'overlap' & lay off more of your customers' customers? = a suicidal joke - Real CEOs don't do 'M&As' -

  • Mattel to buy owner [Hit Entertainment] of train toy line [Thomas the Tank Engine, for $680m in cash], AP via Boston Globe, B6.

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • States have cut 49,000 jobs over the past year, localities 210,000 and the federal government 30,000 as tax revenues have plunged, Labor Dept. files show, Boston Globe, A1 pointer to A11.
    Dip in government jobs playing role in nation's anemic "recovery" [our quotes] - Private hiring up, but [official] jobless rate is still very high [9.1%], AP via Boston Globe, A11 target article.
    [And that means the real jobless rate is much worse.]
  • Vatican calls for a new world economic order - Says focus must be the common good, AP via Boston Globe, B6.
    [= a version of The Big Question? Of course, the Vatican has no idea how to design a new economic order or what it would look like (here's our core design, plus several upgrades to accommodate rising expectations), or the fact that you have to get a common-good focus on the national level before you can get it on the global level because we don't yet have the global controls - the European "Union" doesn't even have continental controls.]
  • Housing prices key to recovery, study says, Boston Globe, B5.
    [Wrong. Too specific and therefore irrelevant to much of the economy. The real key to recovery is workweek adjustment downward as much as it takes to regain WW2 levels of full employment and domestic consumer markets (and all their derivative markets), and that would require the smooth and automatic conversion of overtime into OT-targeted training&hiring.]
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. The fading middle class, USAtoday.com
    McLEAN, Va. - ...The recent recession made it worse as employers cut work hours, furloughed workers, froze salaries or imposed layoffs... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. 500 gardaí to retire by year's end: Alan Shatter, RTE.ie
    DUBLIN, Ireland - ...He said no decisions have been made to close garda stations, but some stations may open for shorter hours... - see whole article under today's date.
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Sun-Mon, October 23-24, 2011 while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think there has been a real recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - headlines in Cambridge, Mass. provided by *Porter Sq. Books - "One square above Harvard!" -

    looting- and layoff-triggering MERGERS in the news (archives) -
    Mergers&acquisitions (M&As) provide a last resort for incompetent CEOs & a highway to monopoly - Management's
    economy-shrinking merger skills need replacement by economy-growing workspreading skills -
    Buy instead of build market share? See 'overlap' & lay off more of your customers' customers? = a suicidal joke - Real CEOs don't do 'M&As' -

  • Banks are back in takeovers, 10/24 WSJ, C1.
    ["When will they ever learrrrrrn, When... will... they... ever.... learrrrrrrrrrrrn?" (folksong) ]

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • Veterans' jobless rate outpaces civilians' - Employers often don't understand military skill sets -
    [What, they don't understand, in the words of the immortal Arlo Guthrie, kill....kill.....KILL! ?]
    - 'The last thing they should have to do is to fight for a job.' Pres. Obama, 10/23 Boston Globe, A6.
    [Well, Barack baby, they're gonna keep having to fight for a job unless you wake up to emergency worksharing and long-term-care timesizing.]
  • Lean companies [still] ready to cut,
    10/24 WSJ, B1 target article of following pointer -
    Despite another quarter of 'robust' corporate profits [our quotes] many manufacturers are setting aside money to fund moves aimed at cutting costs and streamlining operations, 10/24 WSJ, A1 pointer to B1.
    Those steps could include job cuts and factory closures.
    [These guys seem to love recession cuz they keep creating more of it! More profits, more hoarding, more cutting directly their own best customers and indirectly their customers' customers. 'As ye sew, so shall ye reap.' Sew cuts, reap cuts. Result = "suicide, everyone else first" = self-fueling diagonally downward spiral with every up-arc spun as Recovery.]
  • Arizona's takeover of mortage insurer PMI Group is the latest indication that the housing bust isn't finished inflicting casualties, 10/24 WSJ, A1 pointer to C1.
  • Why companies aren't getting the employees they need, 10/24 WSJ, R1.
    [Let me guess... cuz they're gettin' sooo many resumes for each position that their pickiness has gone off the scale? And, oh yeah, they're laying off all their "expensive" pre-vested older employees and they're only hiring cheap and desperate twenty-somethings?]
  • Inflated expectations for an economic fix, by Kelly Evans, 10/24 WSJ, C10.
    ...The Federal Reserve [is] fall[ing] well short on one side of its dual mandate: maximum employment....
    [Holy samoleons! This is the first time we've even heard anyone mention that the Fed has a DUAL mandate (fighting against inflation AND unemployment) since 1975! But here's the problem -]
  • More jobs predicted for machines, not people, 10/24 NYT, B3.
    [And that means you GOTTA cut hours to maintain employment and consumer spending with overtime-to-jobs conversion, and cut hours deeper to increase employment and consumer spending, OR ELSE! "Or else" what? Or else you run into the Ford-Reuther Paradox = Henry Ford (car tycoon): "Let's see you unionize these robots!" Walter Reuther (union chief): "Let's see you sell'em cars." War has gotten too drone'd to kill enough 'Mercans to create that magic WW2 wage-boosting labor shortage, and medicine has gotten too good for plagues to do it, so, damn, we'll just have to do it the intelligent way for a change and resume our 1840-1940 workweek reduction. It has the unappreciated advantage of not killing ANY postwar consumers. And we better get going cuz there's lots more people needing jobs, unless you want to split into workers and parasites -]
  • 7 billion - Can humanity hurdle the unprecedented rise in population? op ed by Joel E. Cohen, 10/24 NYT, A19.
    [Uh, we don't need to hurdle them. We just need to have jobs for them.]
    One week from today, the United Nations estimates the world's population will reach seven billion [7,000,000,000]...
    [Gee, there's gotta be a PERFECT girl for me even though I'm 500 years old and have forty-below hormones!]
  • The hole in Europe's budget - The euro becomes a deadly trap, op ed by Paul Krugman, 10/24 NYT, A19.
    ...The whole euro system was designed to fight the last economic war. It is a Maginot Line built to prevent a replay of the 1970s [still no overwhelming labor surplus & low wages, just oil shortage &long lines at gas stations], which is worse than useless when the real danger is a replay of the 1930s [overwhelming labor surplus cum low wages & hyper-coagulated national money supply].
    ...It's looking more and more as if the euro system is doomed... Europe might be better off if it collapses sooner rather than later...
    [cuz the euro system offers no nation-specific control or fine-tuning, eg: the ability print drachmas and inflate your way out of debt (never mind them oldfolks on fixed incomes, they've had a good life).]
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Great Recession leaves Michigan poorer, Census numbers show, 10/23 Booth News Service via AP via Michigan Business Review via MLive.com
    OAKLAND, Mich. - ...Falling home values, along with a drop in car ownership and working hours, hit Michigan residents hard from 2006-10... They own fewer cars, earn less money, work fewer hours and are more likely to be raising children in poverty than in 2006, according to 2010 Census interviews... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. Library board trying to retain Sunday branch hours, 10/24 insideTORONTO.com
    TORONTO, Ont., Canada - ..."The only option was to cut hours," said Doucette, who sits on the library board... - see whole article under today's date.
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Saturday, October 22, 2011 while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think there has been a real recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - headlines in Cambridge, Mass. provided by *Porter Sq. Books - "One square above Harvard!" -

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -

  • Spenders become savers [or rather, debt repayers], hurting recovery, by Helsenrath & Simon, Wall Street Journal, A1.
    ...Since the financial crisis...millions of Americans have [been] delaying purchases until they have the cash. As a result, total household debt - through payment or default - fell by $1.1 trillion or 8.6% from mid-2008 through the first half of 2011, according to the Federal Reserve Bank of New York.... The national belt-tightening known as deleveraging comes as the U.S. economy struggles to fend off a double-dip recession. Paying off [debts] slows consumer spending on appliances, travel and a slew of other products and services....
    [How did France spur travel, health spas, bookshops, and a slew of other leisure industries 1997-2001? By cutting its workweek.]
  • The once-stable income of America's biggest "earners" [our quotes] now fluctuates dramatically from year to year -
    [Easy solution= move the fluctuation to the workweek and fluctuate the workweek AGAINST unemployment. Enforce the existing workweek maximum of 40 hours (with OT conversion) to stabilize employment and wages and spending consumer markets and marketable productivity and sustainable investment targets and investment income, and then fluctuate the workweek downward to raise employment and wages and spending and consumer markets and marketable productivity and profitable investment targets and investment income. So easy - if you can really "think outside the box" and not just talk about it.]
    - And as go the rich, so goes much of the economy, WSJ, C1.
    [Wrong. The luxury markets are not that much of the economy. In fact, it would be more accurate to say, after a certain point in the hyperconcentration of the money supply of a nation, that as the rich "benefit" further, the economy slows further, and vice versa. Of course, if wartime levels of graduated income tax get the megawindfalls of the wealthy back into circulation, we get ... wartime prosperity. But you can do that without the war - or the taxes - by creating an acute enough labor "shortage" (as seen by surplus-spoiled employers) by means of workweek reduction and overtime-to-jobs conversion.]
    Jacqueline Siegel and her husband David couldn't afford to finish building their 90,000-square-foot house - the largest private home in the U.S. - after the credit crunch (photo caption)
    [Poor babies. Maybe it's time they developed some intelligent goals involving quality and not just quantity.]
  • Amid talk of stimulus, Fed wants to bet the house again, by David Reilly, WSJ, B18.
    ...Mr. Bernanke has repeatedly said that there is only so much that monetary policy can achieve when it comes to unemployment....
    [And with interest rates near zero, monetary policy has "shot its wad" and achieved all it can. However, it can to a LOT to worsen unemployment ... by raising them again.]
  • BP's plan for drilling in the Gulf is approved, by Clifford Krauss, New York Times, B1.
    The Obama administration on Friday took another step toward allowing BP to return to the Gulf of Mexico...
    [Such things should, and eventually will (among survivors), be decided by public referendum instead of by alternating, corrupt regimes of Republicans ... and Democrats.]
  • Will Mrs. Merkel wake up in time? To avoid a meltdown, Europe needs a robust bailout - and now, editorial, NYT, A14.
    [There's no such thing as a "robust" bailout. Europe needs to quarantine the clueless within the unified currency or...de-unify the currency - and now. Period. When the wealthy start circumventing market discipline by stealing from their own consumer base to zero or reverse their risk, it's just a matter of time before the crowsnest gets sooo heavy, the ship capsizes and sinks. Greece and Wall Street and all their fellow corrupt, suddenly-communist cowards need to face the music and take their medicine AND MELTDOWN ... alone - meaning they'll get on with bailing themselves out since they've got all the money. (And if they don't, they'll elicit chaos and trigger a French- or Russian-type revolution and be slaughtered along with manymany innocents.) Else the contagion spreads.]
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Police revisit 12-hour shifts for patrol officers, Columbia Daily Tribune via columbiatribune.com
    COLUMBIA, Mo. - ..A committee of officers is examining ways to tweak the 12-hour shift system or scratch it for shorter hours, said patrol Lt. Shelley Jones... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. German Unemployment to Fall Further, Frankfurter Allgemeine Says, Bloomberg.com
    [Thanks to shorter hours = worksharing = short time working = Kurzarbeit.]
    FRANKFURT, Germany - ...If there's a renewed need for shorter working hours, the agency would have to borrow money, Weise told FAZ... - see whole article under today's date.
    [If they're broke because they've been paying for Kurzarbeit for the nation, they are demonstrating the unsustainable, transition-only nature of worksharing with funding from the unemployment insurance fund. Now they need to move on to sustainable Timesizing, which has sustainable funding from, e.g., a tax on overtime and an exemption for reinvestment in OT-targeted training&hiring.]
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Friday, October 21, 2011 while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think there has been a real recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - headlines in Cambridge, Mass. provided by *Porter Sq. Books - "One square above Harvard!" -

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -

  • Massachusetts employers cut 2,300 jobs last month after eliminating more than 10,000 in August, but the unemployment rate fell slightly, Boston Globe, A1 pointer to B5.
    [Proving once again that America's most-published unemployment rate is misleading valium -]
    ...Economists said the decline [is] because discouraged job seekers have stopped looking for work and are no longer counted as unemployed...
  • Wal-Mart cuts back benefits, New York Times, A1 pointer to B1.
    Wal-Mart is substantially reducing health coverage for part-time workers and significantly raising premiums for many full-time staff members.
    [Wal-Mart peels off a bit more of its nice-human mask for Hallowe'en.]
  • Sales of previously owned homes in the U.S. slipped in September amid economic uncertainty, high unemployment and tight lending, Wall Street Journal, A1 pointer to A4.
  • Struggling French banks fought to avoid oversight, WSJ, A1.
    [So did struggling American banks. Come to think of it, so ARE struggling American banks - STILL fighting to avoid oversight. When will they ever learn, when will they eeeee- ver learn... (folksong).]
  • Prepare for Europe's lost weekend, WSJ, C8.
    [Better a lost weekend to prepare for than an entire lost decade to recover from, like right here in the once-great US of A.]
  • Subsidy nation: China's latest 5-year plan pledges heavy investment to support seven emerging industries .\. Can firms in U.S. compete with China?, WSJ, B1.
    [Answer: Only if they have the kind of corporate adaptability and workforce versatility that is fostered by Timesizing's 2nd and 3rd phases that smoothly convert overtime into training and hiring. Next question: Gee, where could China have learned that stuff? (US has block grants, enterprise zones, industrial policy, tax breaks,...?).]
  • Heavy water leaked from a Pakistani nuclear plant's reactor - An official said there was no radiation, WSJ, A1 news squib.
    [Ri-i-ight.]
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. PV Crystalox suspends polysilicon production in Germany and cuts wafering jobs in U.K., PV-Tech.org
    BITTERFELD, Germany - ...The company guided a significant reduction in wafer shipments , compared to previous forecasts and job losses and short time working...
    [So the Jerries save their workforce and consumer base (and btw their economy) by cutting workhours while the Limeys screw themselves cutting jobs (and btw consumer spending and economic growth chances) -]
    The biggest impact will be on ingot and wafer production in the UK.   PV Crystalox...announced that this would lead to “significant job losses in the UK.”... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. Europe pays for lost character, opinion by McGill Mgmt Prof. Reuven Brenner, Asia Times Online via atimes.com
    MONTRÉAL, Québec - ...The lucky decades allowed not only cover for the above accumulating deficiencies, but also promised generous entitlements, shorter hours of work, early retirement, nice pensions - and numerous other perks... - see whole article under today's date.
    [How strange that humanity is now supposed to feel guilty about promises of progress despite unprecedented levels of worksaving technology. And this management professor has no solutions, just guilt manipulation? Well, we have a developed solution granted the sacrifice of "earlier retirement, nice pensions" in return for lifelong employment at shorter and shorter hours.]
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Thursday, October 20, 2011 while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think there has been a real recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - headlines in Cambridge, Mass. provided by *Porter Sq. Books - "One square above Harvard!" -

    growth-choking DOWNSIZING in the news (archives) - all reversible by switching to timesizing -

  • Amgen to cut 32 Massachusetts research jobs [in Cambridge and Woburn], by Robert Weisman, Boston Globe, B6.
    ...The world's largest biotechnology company [is] restructuring.research operations [and] will shed a total of 380 jobs.\.in the U.S. and the U.K....
    [You can't get economic recovery by downsizing. And there will be no recovery until companies switch from downsizing to timesizing. And Amgen is easily big enough to be cutting a percentage of its corporate workweek for all instead of a fraction of its employees - and consumer spending in Cambridge and Woburn which will necessitate cutting a few more employees next year.]
  • At UBS, chief [Sergio Ermotti for only a month so far] pushes for new cuts [unspecified, in the wake of a rogue trading scandal], Wall Street Journal, A1.
    [Ya cain't git to Recoveryville from Cutcity.]

    MAKEWORK: too little, too late, too wasteful, too artificial, too military, too eco-stressing, in the news (archives) - all unnecessary with full employment via emergency worksharing & permanent timesizing -
  • Four local [eastern Mass.] cities get grants to help stop youth violence - Chelsea, Lawrence, Lowell, and Lynn to share $3.38m, Boston Globe, GN4.
    [Wouldn't it be better to just dump the bandaids, cut to the chase and get these kids jobs? Each of these cities could have a city-level timesizing system - with a citywide workweek max over which overtime is automatically converted into OT-targeted training&hiring.]

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • The "economy" [our quotes] picked up a little in recent weeks, but the job market showed little improvement, the Fed's "beige book" survey found, Wall Street Journal, A1 pointer to A6.
    [If the job market didn't pick up, the economy didn't pick up, because the job market has better title to equating with "the economy" than whatever candidate the Fed is backing.]
  • The Dow industrials lost 722.43 points to close at 11504.62, giving up earlier gains...,
    WSJ, A1.
  • Fed survey finds New England businesses uncertain, wary, Boston Globe, B5.
    [But creeping conflicts of interest are making everyone wary of the Fed=the *Creature from Jeckyll Island, and its surveys -]
  • Fed board conflicts of interest cited [by Gov't Accountability Office], Boston Globe, B6.
    [Another reason to turn Fed functions such as rate setting over to something much closer to market forces = public referendum. Central bankers are capable of all kinds of system-destructive stuff, like, say, when Hugo Stinnes engineered the German hyperinflation of the early 1920s and starved to death thousands (=extremely conservative guess) of Germans with fixed incomes or without enough athleticism to run to the baker while their barrowful of banknotes would still buy a loaf of bread. Ref. *The Penniless Billionaires. And speaking of starvation-inducing inflation -]
  • Food and energy costs again driving up consumer prices, NYT via Boston Globe, B8.
    [Just in time for those 32 "lucky" downsizees at Amgen - see above.]
    Consumer prices rose 0.3% in September...,
    WSJ, A1 pointer to A6.
  • ...Republican presidential candidate Gov. Rick Perry said...he would push.\.plan for flat tax, WSJ, A1 photo caption.
    [First let him show his good faith by proposing that the already flat - but truncated - social security tax continue all the way up the income brackets .]
  • Washington DC nosed out San Jose CA as the US metropolitan area with the highest median income, WSJ, A1 ptr to A6.
    [There goes the last "check and balance." Now DC's balloon is completely untethered.]
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Fun with Furloughs: Chico band releases new EP, Enterprise-Record
    CHICO, Calif. - ...Okay, so maybe brainstorming about how to produce and market male undergarments is not the typical topic of conversation at your weekly get-togethers, but that's exactly the kind of unpredictable, yet lively discussion the members of Chico's own Furlough Fridays find themselves getting into during their weekly band practice.... Their unique moniker was inspired by the California State University system's mandated furlough days and was officially adopted by the band after it beat out a list of other potential names proposed to the public in an online vote in 2009... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. Reduced Hours Redux? - Employers and Unions Brace For a Downturn, Spiegel Online via spiegel.de
    BERLIN, Germany - ...Together, they are calling for the government in Berlin to continue funding short-time work programs that helped Germany to successfully weather the 2009 recession without mass unemployment. It was perhaps the most successful program implemented by Chancellor Angela Merkel's former grand coalition government... By expanding the short-time working programs known in German as "Kurzarbeit," her government managed to prevent the tough recession from crushing the country's labor market and causing the kind of mass unemployment [and consumer spending collapse] seen elsewhere... - see whole article under today's date.
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Wednesday, October 19, 2011 while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think there has been a real recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - headlines thanks to colleague Kate's Boston Globe subscription -

    looting- and layoff-triggering MERGERS in the news (archives) -
    Mergers&acquisitions (M&As) provide a last resort for incompetent CEOs & a highway to monopoly - Management's
    economy-shrinking merger skills need replacement by economy-growing workspreading skills -
    Buy instead of build market share? See 'overlap' & lay off more of your customers' customers? = a suicidal joke - Real CEOs don't do 'M&As' -

  • Endeca data firm is sold to a tech giant [Oracle for $??] - Deal is at least 6th in Boston area for Oracle, Boston Globe, B7.

    growth-choking DOWNSIZING in the news (archives) - all reversible by switching to timesizing -
  • 2 more Filene's Basements to shut [in Ohio and Maryland], Boston Globe, B8.

    vanishing RETIREMENT in the news (archives) - no problem with short-time full employment via timesizing -
  • Americans' longevity makes avoiding the retirement pitfalls a crucial matter, by Jenn Abelson, Boston Globe, B5.
    [No, it makes phasing out workLIFE retirement and phasing in workWEEK retirement a crucial matter. LIFEtime retirement is a blank check on society and a waste of talent as longevity gets longer. And when we're working the shorter timesized hours we should be working in a robotizing economy, we can "retire" every longer and longer weekend and live longer and longer without burdening the economy.]

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • Investment in New England start-ups falls - Venture firms shy from life sciences [=bioengineering & frankenfoods? good!], Boston Globe, B7.
  • SJC [Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court] puts foreclosure sales in doubt - More ownership questions raised,
    by Erin Ailworth, Boston Globe, A1.
    ...added further turmoil to the housing market yesterday...leaves in limbo hundreds, if not thousands, of people who bought homes seized by lenders under questionable circumstances. They are left with no easy recourse.... "It leaves us nowhere," said Edward Bloom, president of the Real Estate Bar Association for Massachusetts....
  • Moving past hurdles - 20 employers turn out for jobs fair for those with impaired vision, a group with diverse skills but a 37% unemployment rate, Boston Globe, B7.
    [That's great, and yesterday we had a story about job fairs for felons in Connecticut, but meanwhile, what do the unimpaired long-term unemployed do while Americans continue to ignore their own 1840-1940 history of worksharing and workweek reduction, and zone out on all the zombie non-solutions that refuse to die in the media? Guess you have to live under a bridge until you get impaired or arrested.]
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Cabinet boosts short-time work scheme to curb rise in unemplyoment, swissinfo.ch
    BERN, Switzerland - ...A labour scheme offering shortened working hours with the state subsidising lost wages has been extended amid fears of a global economic slowdown. The cabinet decided to grant companies compensation for 18 months if they reduce work hours instead of laying off their employees. The measure will take effect from January 2012 and be valid for two years. The regular maximum length for short-time work is 12 months. The economics ministry said short-time work [alias worksharing] was an effective way to prevent job cuts as Switzerland’s export-oriented industry is suffering from the impact of the strong Swiss franc... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. Matthew Norman: GPs - like glorified plumbers only with shorter hours, The Independent via independent.co.uk
    LONDON, England - ...I trust no physician will take umbrage if we describe the GP as a glorified plumber with shorter hours, much better pay and a less cumbersome toolbox... - see whole article under today's date.
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Tuesday, October 18, 2011 while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think there has been a real recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - headlines in Cambridge, Mass. provided by *Porter Sq. Books - "One square above Harvard!" -

    looting- and layoff-triggering MERGERS in the news (archives) -
    Mergers&acquisitions (M&As) provide a last resort for incompetent CEOs & a highway to monopoly - Management's
    economy-shrinking merger skills need replacement by economy-growing workspreading skills -
    Buy instead of build market share? See 'overlap' & lay off more of your customers' customers? = a suicidal joke - Real CEOs don't do 'M&As' -

  • UK security-services contractor G4S...bought Danish outsourcing provider [huh] ISS for $8.2 billion,
    Wall Street Journal, A1 pointer to B3.
    [Oh now, there's a constructive role! "Allow us to provide you and your economy with outsourcing services, and btw, would you care for a side of strychnine and a take-home canister of Zyklon-B?"]

    growth-choking DOWNSIZING in the news (archives) - all reversible by switching to timesizing -
  • Lowe's cuts back on stores, WSJ, B8.
    ...is shutting 20 of its home-improvement stores...affect[ing] about 1,950 employees...
  • Discounter to shutter four stores in Massachusetts [Braintree, Peabody, Saugus, Watertown: 15% of locations nationwide] - Financially troubled Filene's Basement cut to three stores in state [survivors=BackBay, Newton, Norwood], by Jenn Abelson, Boston Globe, B5.
    ...The shops would be shuttered around Christmas....
    ["Around Christmas"? Don't they have the sense to take advantage of post-Xmas shopping?]
  • IRS says cuts would hurt service, AP via Boston Globe, B6.
    Legislation that would trim $100s of millions from the IRS budget would force significant cuts in the services it provides taxpayers and cost the government $4 billion annually in lost revenue, the agency warned Congress yesterday.... The House Appropriations Committee has approved a bill that would provide...$600 million less than [the IRS] received last year and $1.8 billion less than Pres. Obama requested...
    [So the rest of the world can continue to discount the once-great USA - its own Congress is starting to defund itself. As Republican VP Theodore Roosevelt wrote in 1900 when Republicans were still sane, "When the people will not or cannot work together; when they permit groups of extremists to decline to accept anything that does not coincide with their own extreme views...then they have themselves chiefly to blame if the power is grasped by stronger [tyrannical] hands." - from TR's biography "Oliver Cromwell" (Scribners), p.190. And here's a Republican senator decrying just that -]
    Brown sees failure in Democrat [&] GOP efforts to repair economy - Cites own efforts at compromise, by Megan Woolhouse, Boston Globe, B5.
    ...Sen. Scott Brown [MA] said the nation...is hobbled by a political obstructionism that he called "disgusting."
    "...There's no Democrat bill that's going to pass, folks. There's no Republican bill, either," he said before 300 businesspeople. "Let's stop playing games."...after he voted against the Obama plan last week....
    [This guy is a danger to himself - like most Republicans these days. But the Dems don't even know what kind of battle they're in.]

    MAKEWORK: too little, too late, too wasteful, too artificial, too military, too eco-stressing, in the news (archives) - all unnecessary with full employment via emergency worksharing & permanent timesizing -
  • [another new category - makework for congressmen!]
    Farmers facing loss of subsidy may get new one - "Aid" to healthy sector [our quotes], New York Times, A1.
    ...In the name of deficit reduction [LOL] lawmakers from both parties are calling for the end of a longstanding agricultural subsidy that puts about $5 billion a year [of forced charity from taxpayers?] in the pockets of their farmer [=agrobiz CEOs] constituents.... But in the same breath, the lawmakers and their farm lobby allies [=puppeteers] are seeking to send most of the money - under a new name - straight back to the same farmers with most of the benefits going to large farms that grow commodity crops like corn, soybeans, wheat and cotton. In essence, lawmakers would replace one subsidy with a new one...
    [This at a time when American activism is finally stirring again? These clowns are suicidal - except there's no third party.]

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • Late credit card payments rise - Increase is small but worrisome,
    Boston Globe, B6.
  • Shoppers are reining in impulse buys - Online research curbing need to browses aisles, Bloomberg via Boston Globe, B6.
  • Stocks slid back into red, WSJ, C1.
    The DJIA fell 247.49 points or 2.13% to 11397.00 putting it back in the red for 2011 as concerns over the progress of Europe's debt talks spurred a selloff that erased Friday's gains..., WSJ, A1 pointer to C1 above.
    [We told you so. And the Dow has a much bigger problem than Europe -]
  • Traders warn of market cracks, WSJ, A1.
    [Aren't these the same guys who want to do away with government? Market cracks are no problem as long as we don't have to keep sacrificing economic dynamism to "save" the rich. The more money we redistribute to socialism for the rich, the smaller the percentage that gets spent and the larger the percentage that goes out of circulation. Whoever invented "too big to fail" doomed today's pink-for-the-plutocrats "capitalism."]
  • US factory output rises third straight month, Fed reports - Adds to signals slump is ending, Boston Globe, B7.
    [No it doesn't - not with this final sentence -]
    ...A key reason for the factory growth is that businesses are investing more in equipment.
    [A nd you better believe (A) it's work-saving equipment and (B) it will be followed by downsizing employee-consumers and slump deepening.]
  • Greek bureaucracy defies cuts, WSJ, A1 pointer to A5.
    [And even so, -]
    Greek economy stalls [as it should - it's called "learning by experience"] as Europe argues over debt [which is none of its business, except for the prematurely unified currency], WSJ, A1.
    [Vee sayd eet vuns, vee sayd eet a tousan times = quarantine them, and if you can't figure out how to firewall them inside the euro zone, deport them back to the drachma. And same for any other EU member who's experimenting with parasitism.]
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Which policies do you support only in recessionary times? WashingtonPost.com
    WASHINGTON, D.C. - ...Work sharing programs, where you pay employers to cut hours rather than fire employees...should have been a much bigger part of our response. But in normal times, again, those programs would be insane: taxpayer money shouldn’t be encouraging employers to cut hours rather than fire unproductive employees... - see whole article under today's date.
    [He's right. Cutting jobs and markets should be discouraged by a confiscatory tax on overtime profits and overwork earnings, and if you want to use a carrot as well as a stick, encourage employers to cut hours rather than fire employees (it's been a lot more than just the unproductive who've been cut) with the revenues from aforesaid overtime and overwork, taxes. And there will be no more "normal times" until we do this, because responding to worksaving technology by downsizing instead of timesizing is leaving us with Reuther's retort, "Let's see you SELL all this stuff to the robots that now manufacture it."]
  2. Incomes, house prices leave young British Columbia families worse off than anywhere in Canada, VancouverSun.com
    NEW WESTMINSTER, B.C., Canada - ...He recommends three policies to help these families afford to spend more time together:... EI and CPP premiums paid by employers to make it more expensive to use employees more than 35 hours a week, thus creating flex time and reducing the work week by three to five hours...- see whole article under today's date.
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Sun-Mon, October 16-17, 2011 while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think there has been a real recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - headlines in Cambridge, Mass. provided by *Porter Sq. Books - "One square above Harvard!" -

    looting- and layoff-triggering MERGERS in the news (archives) -
    Mergers&acquisitions (M&As) provide a last resort for incompetent CEOs & a highway to monopoly - Management's
    economy-shrinking merger skills need replacement by economy-growing workspreading skills -
    Buy instead of build market share? See 'overlap' & lay off more of your customers' customers? = a suicidal joke - Real CEOs don't do 'M&As' -

  • Kinder Morgan a-greed to acquire rival El Paso Corp. in a $21.1 billion deal that will create a giant operator of natural-gas pipelines, 10/17 Wall St Journal, A1:1 pointer to A1:3.
    [Just what we need, another energy monopoly. What was that complaint you had about the old government-regulated monopolistic utilities?]

    MAKEWORK: too little, too late, too wasteful, too artificial, too military, too eco-stressing, in the news (archives) - all unnecessary with full employment via emergency worksharing & permanent timesizing -
  • [new category - makework for foreigners!]
    Pleas undheeded as students' U.S. jobs soured, 10/17 NY Times, A1.
    ..."Cultural exchange program" [aka wage slavery for US corporations - our quotes] run for half a century by the federal government [(State Dept.) in which foreign] students paid as much as $6,000 to take part [and were led to] expect...to see the best of this country, to make American friends and sightsee, with a summer jobs to finance it all. Instead, many students...placed at [Hershey's] packing plant [are] working grueling night shifts on speeding production lines, repeatedly lifting boxes weighing as much as 60 pounds and financially drained by low pay and unexpected extra costs for housing and transportation. Their complaints to the contractor running [=looting?] the program on behalf of the State Dept. were met with threats that they could be sent home....
    [Another privatization="contracting out" of the lost Bush years? This program is an ill-conceived flop - send these students home with apologies at government expense and CUT THIS PROGRAM and take a flame-thrower to that part of the State Dept., which has no business creating makework for foreigners when millions of Americans need jobs, and no business messing with market-flouting makework when government should be concentrating on market-oriented worksharing and timesizing in the first place.]

    PRISONS & CRIME in the news (archives) -
  • Conn. prison garden improves lives of inmates, neighbors - Program yields fresh produce, skills for workers, AP via 10/17 Boston Globe, B3.
    MONTVILLE, Connecticut - ...Corrigan Radgowski Correctional Center...Warden Scott Erfe...Lily and Nibbles, two donated goats...
    [Good news intrusion alert! This would make Scott Erfe the Garden Warden. More good news -]
  • Former felons urged to dress for success - In New Haven, job seekers aided, by William Kaempfer, New Haven Register via 10/17 Boston Globe, B5.
    NEW HAVEN, Conn. - ...As the city prepared for its second annual job fair...at the James Hillhouse High School field house..\..its former offender roundtable group added a "prep rally".... Baggy pants are the kiss of death for applicants [so] nearly 100 job seekers, most nattily dressed and with resumes and program-completion certificates in hand, turned out for the event. Nearly all had attended [the] city-sponsored preparatory screening a week before where they got help with resumes and speakers stressed the importance of everything from appearance to eye contact and a firm handshake.... The city has plenty of.\.former offenders looking for work.... The challenge is finding prospective employers willing to keep coming to the [jobs for felons] fairs in a job market where there already is a deep pool of candidates without criminal baggage.
    [Seems like Connecticut really knows how to do this.]
    ...Michael Ben-Elohim [Hebrew for "son of God"!] of Strive-New Haven...provides job-readiness training to former offenders....
    [Well, ya can't get any better help than that!]
    The 2008 federal Second Chance Act has helped fund about 250 prison reentry programs around the country aimed at reducing recidivism by helping former prisoners. The Act has provided $198 million nationally so far.... New Haven...seized the idea of the "prep rally" from...Hartford. "...Employers tell us over and over again...'I can teach people to do the job but I can't teach them to show up on time with the right attitude,' "said.\.Amy Meek, coordinator of New Haven's Prison Re-entry Initiative....
    [Wow, as the Good Book saith, "The meek shall inherit the earth," and with the son of God (Ben-Elohim) onboard, how can they fail?]
    "I have to say, I'm very impressed," said Carleen Keith, of.\.Dattco Bus Co...which is hiring for school bus [makes me a little nervous] and diesel mechanics. "Very professional. Very well groomed.... They're asking the right questions." Kenneth Evans, 20...convicted of a felony in 2009, recently received a certificate as an electrician from Lincoln Technical Institute [but] he doesn't have a preference on what type of work. "You can't have a preference when you don't have a job," he said.

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • Protests inspired by the Occupy Wall Street movement spread world-wide, but there are few signs of a unified set of demands, 10/17 WSJ, A1 pointer to A2.
    [Timesizing would be perfect for them, but so deep is our general ignorance of worktime economics that it will probably not happen till the 3rd or 4th Occupy Wall Street movement, unless some of them notice Timesizing.com, or somebody knows somebody...]
  • Losing their immunity - How dare protesters criticize Wall Street?
    op ed by Paul Krugman, 10/17 NYT, A23.
  • Stock surge has its skeptics, 10/17 WSJ, C1.
    [That's for sure. Just wait till tomorrow.]
  • The shadow of Enron still lingers, 10/17 WSJ, C1.
    [Was it ever really cleaned up? Did all the shafted Enron employees ever get justice? Or was it all swept under the table like all the other crud during the lost years of the Bush regime?]
  • U.S. economy trapped by its circle of strife, by Kelly Evans, 10/17 WSJ, C8.
    ...If there is a lesson from Japan - or the Great Depression - it is that it ain't over when you think it's over. The U.S. economy is going nowhere fast.
  • The already shaky recovery in Massachusetts is in real danger if the economic crisis in Europe continues to worsen, 10/16 Boston Globe, A1 pointer to G1.
    [But in much more danger from the deepening financial and economic crisis right here which these nitwits keep calling a recovery so same ol' worst-practice business politicies, including downsizing, can continue, instead of a thorough changeover to timesizing.]
    Why Europe matters, 10/16 Boston Globe, G1 target article.
    [Short answer: because our media puppeteers desperately need something to distract themselves and us from our own bankruptcy deepening depression-billed-as-"shaky-recovery" - and further delay the obvious structural solution to this structural problem = timesizing.]
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. PEF, Cuomo reach tentative contract deal to avoid 3500 layoffs, 10/16 PoughkeepsieJournal.com
    ALBANY, N.Y. -- After its members rejected a five-year contract Sept. 27, the Public Employees Federation said today it reached a tentative four-year pact that would avoid 3,500 pending layoffs... In addition to a shorter length, the new contract includes reimbursement for workers for nine furlough days at the end of the four-year deal... - see whole article under today's date.
    [Timesizing, not downsizing!]
  2. Defense cuts could threaten local jobs - $450 billion could be cut from defense spending, 10/17 WWLP 22News via wwlp.com
    WESTFIELD, Mass. - ...It's a measure, that if approved, could threaten jobs at Peerless Precision, a Westfield high tech machine shop that manufactures parts for the defense and aerospace industries. "Instead of growing and creating jobs that could end up just allowing us to keep the employees we have and if those sectors don't grow then we might be forced to cut hours or cut people."... - see whole article under today's date.
    [Timesizing OR downsizing - pick one, and remember, you ain't gonna get growth=UPsizing by DOWNsizing. Not that military makework provides any but the sickest jobs... but it's the "conservative's" makework program...]
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Saturday, October 15, 2011 while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think there has been a real recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - headlines in Cambridge, Mass. provided by *Porter Sq. Books - "One square above Harvard!" -

    growth-choking DOWNSIZING in the news (archives) - all reversible by switching to timesizing -

  • Slashing defense spending would cost too many jobs, letter to editor by chairman Brian Dubie of the Aerospace States Assoc.'s Aviation Committee, Boston Globe, A10.
    [If the only way we can provide enough 35-40 hr/wk jobs is by manufacturing and deploying killing machines, isn't it preferable to resume our 1840-1940 policies, cut the workweek and spread and share the vanishing yet-to-be-automated employment? Mr. Dubie and colleagues, get a constructive job for a change.]
  • What's so urgent? by Al Lewis, Wall Street Journal via online.wsj.com
    OK, so for a few hours, or a few days, your BlackBerry didn't work. Research In Motion is sorry... But what is so urgent that the world can't tolerate a BlackBerry network going down?... Layoffs announced via email? You want that right away? How about another robo-signed foreclosure notice from Bank of America?...

    tsunami of BANKRUPTCIES & CLOSINGS (archives) - staunched only by risky war or safe timesizing -
  • Investor's Calendar, Wall Street Journal via online.wsj.com
    A bankruptcy-court judge is scheduled to hold a hearing Monday on the bankruptcy filing of Harrisburg, the capital of Pennsylvania...

    A DELUGE OF DISABILITY & "disability" in the news (archives) - so-o-o unnecessary with the shorter workweeks of the timesizing program -
  • Who's afraid of the dragon? - New research quantifies the effects of Chinese imports [and free trade with the land of highest overpopulation and lowest labor standards], The Economist of London, p.42.
    WASHINGTON, D.C. - Should a free trader laugh or cry?...
    [A free trader should be locked in the clubhouse of the Flat Earth Society because Free Trade is a nice name for downsizing and disability.]
    ...In September...the unemployment rate remained at 9.1% [ignoring a huge ignored dropout of discouraged jobseekers], as jobs barely kept pace with labour force growth; and manufacturing employment fell..\.. On Oct.[11] the Senate passed...a bill that would authorise the Commerce Dept. to impose countervailing tariffs on Chinese imports it deems to have benefited from an undervalued currency.... The bill's advocates...reckon driving away Chinese imports will bring some of these jobs back. But are their claims justified?
    A new paper by three economists: David Autor, David Dorn and Gordon Hanson, looks at the effects of rising Chinese import competition on regional American labour markets from 1990 to 2007. They find that regions whose manufacturers had higher exposure to competition from Chinese imports saw higher overall unemployment, lower labour force participation and reduced wages. Every $1000 of additional Chinese import exposure in a region per worker lowerd the employment rate by 0.77%, enough to add up to several percentage points in the worst affected areas. Mr Autor says that more recent data corroborate these trends... The paper argues that as much as two-thirds of the gains from trade are eliminated due to the losses associated with.\.the displaced workers whose incomes suffer and the taxpayers who must support them....
    [The Economist then strains to offset this data but winds up siding with advocates of corporate socialism to save their true belief in the trade-communism of Free Trade -]
    ...Congress could better help [free] trade's losers with improved assistance than protectionism...
    [But they give Free Trade the coup de grace with this revelation -]
    Mr. Autor's data suggest that as many as 10% of those losing employment following an import shock obtain Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI). The scheme has a present value of nearly $270,000 to a new recipient. When a worker goes on SSDI, he or she is almost certain to be lost forever to the workforce....
    [Still lalala'ing "don't confuse me with facts, my mind's made up," the auto da fe of the Economist says -]
    Better designed designed programmes would help more displace workers find and keep jobs.
    [Notice it's not "keep, or find" so they're accepting import displacement regardless of costs in the name of vague hope of innovation and productivity growth, never mind whether it's marketable productivity, and never mind that they're then going to turn around and deny technological displacement - or claim that it too is "creative destruction" a la Schumpeter. It's pie-in-the-sky nitwits like these true believers at the Economist, constantly recommending austerity-for-others, that have plunged us into this deepening, officially denied depression aka "stumbling recovery at risk of double dip." Tenured economists and their publicists are getting a little tired and wierd with their constant sacrifice of other people's concrete happiness and job security today for their own vague dreams of "innovation" and "competitiveness" in some indefinite future - competitiveness as it turns out, for other people to race to the bottom.]

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • Nowhere to hide - Investors have had a dreadful time in the recent past [WAY worse than the jobless ofcourse!] - The immediate future looks pretty rotten, too, The Economist of London, cover story, p.15.
    [How ironic that we're supposed to be pitying the rich, whose overconcentration and coagulation of the money supply - and conseqent decirculation of same - is the root and cause of the "dreadful rottenness." If we continued our secular 1840-1940 reduction of the workweek and reduced the wage-pummelling labor surplus, we'd not get this kind of black hole of money in a tiny population who can't possibly spend it - or finally, can't even invest it sustainably - and we'd stay out of these cyclically inconcealable crises.]
  • 'Any Advice for the Unemployed?' posted by Demetria Gallegos, Wall Street Journal via online.wsj.com
    ...Do anything that is legal... Volunteer at least 10 hours each week... Retool, return to school... Keep trying... Take a job, even if the pay scale is a lot lower... Get up and move...ever heard of Papua, New Guinea?... Do something to make it look like you have a job... Start a business, any business... Stay fit...
    [Pathetic. But the main thing is not to blame yourself - except for not pushing for worksharing and timesizing ever since you were born into the age of robotics.]
  • As homeowner market sags, apartment building takes off, Boston Globe, A9 inside header.
    [There go 65 years of advances in American homeownership. But as Kate points out, apartments are more ecological for over-population (so maybe we should be aiming for lower population levels by gradual design - instead of our historical wars and plagues).]
  • G-20 seeks solution to Europe's crisis - Leaders debate more support,
    Boston Globe, B1.
  • Irish judges lose wigs in austerity move, Boston Globe, A3.
    [There go the wig makers' jobs and here comes deeper recession.]
  • Should the Globe have named the Bulger tipster? all letters to editor have been against certain Globe employees' sick decision, Boston Globe, A10.
    [Will the Globe's identity betrayal discourage future tipsters? Absolutely. Are Whitey Bulger and associates crazy/sick enough to go after the tipster now that Globe editors have betrayed her? Probably. Now her only security, since Iceland does not have a witness protection program, is to change her name and address and enlist the support of all 318,451 of her fellow Icelanders to protect her, a scenario that is actually feasible based on the centuries-old solidarity of Icelanders. Meanwhile, every single one of the Boston Globe editors and employees who supported this decision should be instantly fired and blacklisted from any future media jobs. They don't have the common sense of a 2-by-4.]
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Clallam County to shorten work week in 2012, Peninsula Daily via peninsuladailynews.com
    PORT ANGELES, Wash. - ...After those meetings, Clallam County is still $800,000 short of a balanced budget. The 37.5-hour work week helps but still leaves the county $340,000 in the red. About half of the county’s workforce went to a 37.5-hour work week in 2002. The 6.25% cut could mean shorter hours or unpaid furlough days for the 164 employees affected in 2012.... “We’re not going to lay off 30 people,” Jones said. “We just can’t run government with that many people gone. But we’re still about $400,000 short."... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. Occupy Wall Street? Sorry, got to go to work, Wilkes Barre Times-Leader via timesleader.com
    WILKES BARRE, Pa. - ...Skippies was an acronym, of sorts. It meant “School Kids with Income and Purchasing Power.” Coined around the year 2000, the term referred to a trend that began in the ‘80s and snowballed. The trend was highschool kids working 20 and even 30 hours a week at their “part time” jobs... - see whole article under today's date.
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Friday, October 14, 2011 while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think there has been a real recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - headlines in Cambridge, Mass. provided by *Porter Sq. Books - "One square above Harvard!" -

    looting- and layoff-triggering MERGERS in the news (archives) -
    Mergers&acquisitions (M&As) provide a last resort for incompetent CEOs & a highway to monopoly - Management's
    economy-shrinking merger skills need replacement by economy-growing workspreading skills -
    Buy instead of build market share? See 'overlap' & lay off more of your customers' customers? = a suicidal joke - Real CEOs don't do 'M&As' -

  • Woburn MA blood testing firm sold - Miami company [OPKO Health Inc.] buys start-up [seven-year-old Claros Diagnostics Inc.] for $49 million, 10/02 Boston Globe, A1 pointer to G1.
    [Is Claros in trouble? If not, it should be illegal to sell it. Founders cashing out or "getting rich" is an invalid and system-destructive reason in the Ecological Age. If founders desire detachment, let them delegate management to hired executives and step back. This required submission to market discipline will be business-as-usual in 100 years and probably in just 50. See other comments below under BANKRUPTCIES.]

    growth-choking DOWNSIZING in the news (archives) - all reversible by switching to timesizing -
  • Gap Inc. plans to shut more than a fifth of its Gap stores in North America over the next two years,
    Wall Street Journal, A1 pointer to B1.
  • Friendly's targets pensions, agency says - Shedding obligations is called goal of bankruptcy, a claim the company denies, by Jenn Abelson, Boston Globe, B5.
    ...Friendly's, the Wilbraham MA chain that is owned by private equity firm Sun Capital Partners Inc., sought bankruptcy protection last week under Chapter 11 and abruptly shuttered 63 stores and laid off about 1,200 workers....
  • The [NY] Times to cut up to 20 news jobs, NYT, B5.

    vanishing RETIREMENT in the news (archives) - no problem with short-time full employment via timesizing -
  • Friendly's targets pensions, agency says - Shedding obligations is called goal of [Friendly's] bankruptcy, a claim the company denies, by Jenn Abelson, Boston Globe, B5.
    A federal agency [Pension Benefit Guarantee Corp.] that monitors company pension plans is accusing Friendly's Ice Cream Corp. of filing for bankruptcy protection in order to get out of paying the pensions of nearly 6,000 workers and retirees....
    The company said it was a casualty of a difficult economy, high supply costs, and changing customer tastes....
    "It looks like Friendly's and Sun Capital are trying to make their employees and retirees [and consumer spending and marketable productivity and sustainable investment and any chance of a real economic recovery and in the last analysis, themselves] bear the brunt of the company's restructuring...," said Josh Gotbaum, director of the PBGC....
    [In short, Friendly's is accused of becoming distinctly unfriendly to its employees. Another all-American executive team asking, How can we concentrate and decirculate more of the nation's money supply in the pockets of tiny richest fraction of the population and deepen this recession? Ergo ... time for a boycott?]

    tsunami of BANKRUPTCIES & CLOSINGS (archives) - staunched only by risky war or safe timesizing -
  • Friendly's targets pensions, agency says - Shedding obligations is called goal of bankruptcy, a claim the company denies, by Jenn Abelson, Boston Globe, B5.
    ...Friendly's, the Wilbraham MA chain that is owned by private equity firm Sun Capital Partners Inc., sought bankruptcy protection last week under Chapter 11 and abruptly shuttered 63 stores and laid off about 1,200 workers....
    [Eventually, mergers and acquisitions - actually not respect for, but an escape from, market forces - will be illegal except in cases of corporate extremis (near-bankruptcy). CEOs must face market discipline as well as license. And even in corporate extremis, we'll extend Glass-Steagall to separate the functions of brokerage/investment and corporate ownership, and require that no acquisitions of near-bankrupt companies can take place without inherent interest and expertise on the part of the acquirer in the corporate mission of the acquiree. In short, no more company ownership by investment funds or holding companies or other entities that have only a quantitative (bottom-line/milch cow) interest. We're moving from the age of quantity into the age of quality, but this does not happen by itself and must be designed and implemented, piece by piece so we can get beyond current, primitive, short-term, unextended-self-interest capitalism whose parts tend to function as if their goal was Suicide, Everyone Else First.]

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • America's incomes have dropped since 2000 and aren't expected to make up the lost ground before 2021, according to a survey of economists, Wall Street Journal, A1 pointer to B1.
  • Banking sector hit by sell-off after JP Morgan reports flat earnings,
    Financial Times, p.22.
    The banks falter - A gloomy outlook on profits reflects the economy, but also bankers' own failures,
    editorial, NYT, A23.
    Following banks, shares close down on Wall Street, NYT, B7.
    ...Dow down 40.72 points or 0.35% at 11,478.13...
  • Slowdown worries knock global equities...- Jitters over Italian political outlook,
    Financial Times, p.22.
  • Royal Bank of Scotland and Lloyds drive FTSE loses...7.4% to 173 1/4 p...,
    Financial Times, p.22.
  • Vital signs - The U.S. trade group with China is wider, WSJ, A1.
    A 12-month moving average of the trade deficit with China increased slightly to $24 billion in August...
  • "Troubles" of West take toll on emerging economies, WSJ, A1.
    [Our quotes - the West's troubles ain't the same scale - yet - as those of emerging economies, but we're working on it.]
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Buffalo's unemployed discouraged with job market, WBFO via publicbroadcasting.net
    BUFFALO, N.Y. - ..."Anything within 20 to 30 hours a week is way better than being on social services. Buffalo is one of those town where even on minimum wage you can make a living, so survival is key," said Martinez... - see whole article under today's date.
    [So hours are getting shorter anyway unless you have a full time job where you have to work 80 hours a week to make up for everyone that got laid off - but there are still people who don't get it even in the places that are leading the world, like France with the world's lowest nationwide workweek -]
  2. Raymond Blanc interview: [Is it really all over for French food?] "I want to show that France is still a country of innovation' - French superchef Raymond Blanc is bullish about the cuisine of his homeland, Telegraph.co.uk
    PARIS, France - ...The blame, according to Blanc, can be laid at the feet of French politicians and the 35-hour week, which became law in 2000. This is not enough time for the preparation, cooking and enjoyment of a truly great meal. “We pick ingredients, we apply heat, we transform them. It takes a lot of time,” he says. “It’s not a factory. Can you do it in 35 hours a week? Of course not.”... - see whole article under today's date.
    [But that's what they said at 40 hours a week, and 48 hours a week, and 54 hours, and 60 and 66 and 72 and 80 and.... What a simpleton. He would cut employment and his own markets to go back to 39-40 hours a week or higher. How high, Raymond?]
  3. US Unemployment – The Longer View, Global Economic Intersection via econintersect.com
    BOSTON, Mass. - ...Prof. Schor: Shorter hours of work are possible at many levels–more schooling at the beginning of the worklife, four day workweeks, and then tapering off hours at the end of the work life. The key is to contract from where we are. From the 1970s until the crash, people who [still] had jobs were putting in more than 200 more hours per year... - see whole article under today's date.
  4. Economic Fact Book Germany, Danske Bank A/S via FXstreet.com
    COPENHAGEN, Denmark - ...A government-subsidised, reduced working hour scheme – Kurzarbeit – has supported the labour market and unemployment is now back at pre-crisis levels. The labour force is skilled and competitive... - see whole article under today's date.
  5. Deadlock over matrons, boarding masters working hours, Mmegi Online via mmegi.bw
    GABARONE, Botswana - The dispute over the working hours of boarding masters and matrons remain unresolved after the first stage of talks between Botswana Public Employees Union (BoPEU) and the Directorate on Public Service Management ended inconclusively. BoPEU and DPSM met early this month, following the union's concerns about what they called "conflicting conditions" in the new Public Service Act, which recommends that public service workers work an eight hour day, starting from 7.30am to 4.30pm. This is despite the fact that the nature of matrons and boarding masters' jobs require them to work longer hours than those prescribed... - see whole article under today's date.
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Thursday, October 13, 2011 while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think there has been a real recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - headlines in Cambridge, Mass. provided by *Porter Sq. Books - "One square above Harvard!" -

    vanishing RETIREMENT in the news (archives) - no problem with short-time full employment via timesizing -

  • Pension funds [of cities and towns across Massachusetts] got cheated [out of $400m/yr for a decade] , lawsuit says - But state Attorney General Martha Coakley won't join high-stakes case versus State Street Bank, Boston Globe, B7.

    tsunami of BANKRUPTCIES & CLOSINGS (archives) - staunched only by risky war or safe timesizing -
  • Harrisburg, [capital of] Pa., filed for bankruptcy protection..., Wall Street Journal, A1 pointer to A3.
    [William Penn and the state's Quaker fathers are clawing at their coffin lids.]
    ...in a case that is being closely watched by other cities and towns looking for ways out of dire financial troubles.

    PRISONS & CRIME in the news (archives) -
  • Long jail terms on rise - Inside trades draw lengthier sentences, analysis finds..., WSJ, C1.

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • Prices for Treasuries tumbled, pushing yields to their highest level in more than a month, as demand for U.S. government debt waned, WSJ, A1 pointer to C1.
    [Your NEW Republican Party has turned U.S. Treasury bills into junk bonds. It's getting to the point where we don't need more "elections" (using rigged Republican-manufactured Diebold, ES&S &/or Hart InterCivic voting machines) - we need flame-throwers, and your old Democratic Party ain't catching on and catching up to it.]
  • Vital signs - The ratio of unemployed people to job openings is up, WSJ, graph caption, A1.
    There were 4.6 unemployed people for every job opening in August, up from 4.3 a month earlier, according to the Labor Dept. The ratio - which is a proxy for [huh] how hard it is to find work - is down from its recession-era highs [as if we aren't still in it] of just shy of 7, but remains more than twice as high as its prerecession levels.
  • With jobless numbers high, workers lose pricing power [ie: ability to negotiate raises or even maintain wage levels], by Kelly Evans, WSJ, C12.
    Competition drives down prices. This is as true in the labor market as with any other marketplace...
    [And as wages go, so go consumer markets and their dependents = all other markets.]
  • No jobs bill, and no ideas -
    [Another version of The Big Question. And still no perception of the obvious: worksharing.]
    - Republicans are good at shooting down useful economic plans, but have none of their own, editorial, NY Times, A24.
    [Well, they did for the first 75 years of their history, and it was cutting the workweek and sharing-spreading the vanishing unmechanized work.]
  • Web start-ups hit cash crunch, WSJ, B1.
    Mismatch - The number of Web start-ups has grown, but available capital is down, graph caption
    [Actually the available capital is way way way up with corporations and the diminishing number of exponentially wealthy individuals sitting on trillions and trillions of dollars of cash that they can't or won't "put back to work creating jobs" because consumer and business spending is down and there's less market for all the productivity they'd need to sustainably, let alone profitably, invest in. So they clutch their swelling hoard tighter and tighter - thus deepening the downturn. They are the problem (ie: the hyperconcentration of the money supply) but ... they also own the media and the universities and the politicians - but not quite yet the In-ter-net. But there's a few super-rich who realize they're committing suicide, everyone else first -]
  • Warren Buffett "earned" [our quotes] almost $63 million last year, yet paid less than $7 million [11%] in federal income tax..., WSJ, A1 pointer to C1.
    ...according to a letter he sent to a Republican lawmaker.
    Buffett builds his tax-the-rich case,
    WSJ, C1 target article.
  • Thinking big on tiny guys, WSJ, C12.
    Small and medium-size enterprises are the lifeblood of any economy. But how do you ensure the blood keeps circulating when the banking system has had a cardiac arrest?
    [This is another version of The Big Question.]
    UK Chancellor of the Exchequer George Osborne is promising to channel government money directly to the sector via "credit easing," but this may be easier said than done...
    [Let's go back a bit and ask Where's The Beef? Why are small & midsize enterprises "the lifeblood of any economy"? Why is small business "the economic engine"? Because in popular lore, they are the big source of natural, market-demanded jobs, no makework or job-creation required. OK, so it's really JOBS we're interested in, and now that Steve has expired that's one less distraction... So there's nothing really "direct" about channeling money to small business. "Direct" would be channeling money to JOBS. But jobs are not money, they're work, and work is measured directly in time, not money. So there's nothing really "direct" about channeling MONEY to jobs. "Direct" would be channeling WORKTIME to jobs. But jobs are not abstract, they're people. So "direct" would be channeling worktime to PEOPLE. But real worktime doesn't come out of thin air or out of some bureaucrat's imagination or wishlist. They come from the Market. And the Market is shrinking. So "more" is not in the cards. What to do? Only one solution. Employees have to SHARE the vanishing worktime and employers have to SPREAD the vanishing worktime. There's no downside to this, no adverse effects, only transitional rough spots, because as the desperate surplus of resumes resolves into shorter-hour jobs, the downward pressure on wages weakens and sinking wages firm and rise. Wales is leading the way on worksharing in the U.K. George Osborne needs to quit wasting taxpayer money on indirect and ineffectual forced charity for the well-off and ... look Welsh-ward. The solution is right under his aristocratic nose if he can but learn from the humble working-class Welsh. As Horace Greeley almost said, "Go Welsh, young man, go Welsh."]
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Are We Back to Liking Unions? CityWeekly.net
    [Only if they focus on their (and our) power issue = shorter hours (and no labor surplus) for all.]
    SALT LAKE CITY, Ut. - ...I only once belonged to a union. I have to admit, the wages were decent... Plus, when I was "furloughed," I had a month off to travel around on airline travel passes... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. Power crisis measures, The Express Tribune via tribune.com.pk
    ISLAMABAD, Pakistan - ...Consider some of the measures being proposed: shorter working hours and a two-day weekend... - see whole article under today's date.
    [Oh those nasty two-day weekends! Let's go back to one-! (Pakistanis must be the original "slaves who love their chains.")]
  3. Business community rejects five-day workweek, Business Recorder (blog) via brecorder.com
    ISLAMABAD, Pakistan - Business community expressed serious reservations on Thursday over the federal government plan to enforce five-day workweek in the country saying that the decision has been taken without the consultation of traders and industrialists... - see whole article under today's date.
    [Oops, hold the "welcome to 1940 for Pakistanis" - they're going back to their luddism and third-world sweatshops - like Dickens' "dark Satanic mills" of 1840.]
  4. BONUS excerpt - Chicago Mayor Trashes Politics of Waste Removal, by Douglas Belkin, WSJ, A1.
    CHICAGO, Illin. - ...It's a tough job but quitting time usually comes early. Total time worked on a typical shift: about 5 1/2 hours, according to a city audit. "Nobody works for the city for 8 hours," said Kris Squalls, a...teamster who has driven a city garbage truck for 25 years and now makes about $70,000 a year. "Not the mayor, not anybody."
    Since taking office...Mayor Rahm Emanuel has promised to change that attitude and fix the way the city does business, part of a broad effort to close a $636 million budget gap...
    [Is this hourly wage work and the city's paying for 8 hours, or is this piecework and the city's paying just to get the overall job done, in which case, what's the problem? Switch to hourly and watch 5 1/2 hours stretch to 10 1/2.]
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Wednesday, October 12, 2011 while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think there has been a real recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - headlines in Cambridge, Mass. provided by *Porter Sq. Books - "One square above Harvard!" -

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -

  • The Senate blocks Obama's $447 billion jobs bill, Wall Street Journal, A1 pointer to A4.
    The vote was 50-49 in favor of the bill, which needed 60 votes to move forward.
    [Perhaps Bam should have focused on jobs when he had the Senate, and only then worried about benefits such as health care. After all, you can't get benefits until you have a job.]
  • Wall Street looks headed for an inhibited new era after the U.S. government outlined a proposal, known as the "Volker rule," to sharply limit banks' ability to make bets with their own capital, WSJ, A1 pointer to C1(?)
    [But then, there are no clique of clowns on this planet who need inhibitions more than Wall Streeters. And as for a "new" era of limits, wasn't it just back in 1999 under Bill Clinton when this street of stupids got the last great bulwark against depression-dejavu repealed? The Glass-Steagall Banking Act kept separate banking, insurance and brokerage=investing="making bets," so that banks weren't not even tempted to make bets with "their own" [yeah riiight] capital. Wall Street needs to be nuked, not just occupied. They're incapable of learning from their mistakes. But now, hopefully, Wall St. will get "nuked" -]
  • Hefty job losses expected on Wall St. through 2012, Boston Globe, B11.
    [Maybe when the results of their 20-30 year promotion of downsizing-companies' stocks hit themselves, they'll wake up and support the two most fundamental and urgent structural modifications in every economy on the planet that wishes to survive = unemployment-controlled workweeks to maximize employment and consumer spending, and automatic overtime conversion into training and hiring to maximize workforce versatility.]
  • EU bailout fault lines exposed [by] Slovakia, WSJ, A1.
    ...held up the expansion of the euro zone's bailout fund after the 16 other members ratified the changes, throwing up a new roadblock to the Continent's efforts to tame its debt crisis...
    [Time to dismantle the euro zone and relearn individual-nation responsibility and fine-tuning. After all, that's the whole idea behind private property and the root problem with socialism-communism. But the unified currency and globalization are just control-clobbering forms of nation-level communism - they only work if "all men are angels," i.e., have extremely extended self-interest. The euro was really probably invented cuz Europeans were nervous about the USA, but now the only people nervous about the USA are Americans. The rest of the world is relieved that the great meddling "democracy" can no longer afford to keep meddling on the same democracy-stifling level. Now the U.S. is no longer a threat to anyone but itself and just enough third-world mountain tribes to keep "the conservative's makework campaign" = war (dba "defense"), guttering in the grate.]
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Who Cares About JetPacks? Whatever Happened to the 30-Hour Work Week? The Atlantic.com
    WASHINGTON, D,C. - ...The United States Senate passed a bill to mandate a 30-hour work week in 1933, only to have it run aground in the House without support from President Roosevelt../.. Thirty hours, eh? Seems like most salaried types I know hit that every three days... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. Five-day workweek, other steps to help reduce power crisis, Business Recorder (blog) via brecorder.com
    ISLAMABAD, Pakistan - The energy conservation plan approved by the Federal Cabinet on Wednesday envisages a five-day workweek, staggered holidays for industry, early closure of commercial markets... - see whole article under today's date.
    [So presumably Pakistan previously had a six-day or unregulated workweek. Welcome, Pakistan, to 1940! South Korea has also recently arrived.]
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Tuesday, October 11, 2011 while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think there has been a real recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -

    growth-choking DOWNSIZING in the news (archives) - all reversible by switching to timesizing -

  • New York City's securities industry could lose nearly 10,000 jobs by the end of 2012, N.Y. State's comptroller [Thomas DiNapoli] predicted, Wall Street Journal, A1 pointer to C1.
    Wall Street shrinkage - ...By 2013, by Andrew Grossman, WSJ, C1 target article.
    ...by the end of 2012, a painful blow to the area's economy and government budgets....
    [Couldn't happen to a more deserving bunch of thoughtless jocks.]
    Since January 2008, the securities industry in New York has seen 22,000 jobs evaporate. If DiNapoli's prediction...comes true, that would represent a decline of 17%. About 4,100 jobs have been eliminated since April, and deeper cuts are widely seen as inevitable given a recent flurry of corporate expense-trimming announcements.
    [Let's see then if Wall Street can perform the hat trick it's been recommending for the last 20 years, getting Schumpeter's voodoo "creative destruction" = growth aka UPsizing ... out of DOWNsizing.]
    Goldman Sachs Group Inc...will cut 1,000 jobs,
    and Credit Suisse Group AG and Barclays PLC also have announced [unspecified] layoffs.
    ...Bank of America Corp...plans to lay off 30,000 workers. It isn't clear how many of the banks' cuts will come in New York or how many will be in the securities operations....

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • Vital signs - An index of world economic activity is pointing down, WSJ, A1 graph caption.
    The OECD's indicator of economic activity in its 34 nations fell to 100.8 in August from 101.4 in July. Readings above 100 indicate activity above the long-term trend...
    [Then, boy, is this index ever sweetened!]
  • North American auto sales stall as wary consumers sense trouble, Casselman & Lahart, Toronto Globe, A1 pointer to B1.
    [More likely, jobless consumers sense empty bank accounts.]
  • Reuters breakingviews - Bank of China intervention is a Band-Aid solution, Reuters via Toronto Globe, B14.
    ...to prop up the price of bank shares by buying in the market...
    [But isn't this similar to the Fed's QE, which Reuters covered without criticism?]
  • Economists win Nobel for focus on real world, WSJ, A3.
    [Is this some kind of a joke?]
    Business "brains" [our quotes - by name, Thomas J. Sargent of NYU and Christopher A. Sims of Princeton] - How this year's Nobel laureates in economics have shaped the way global financial leaders make their decisions, Toronto Globe, A1 pointer to B11 [sic, actually B12].
    [And they're giving these dufuses Nobels? They should be tossing them in jail! When are we going to stop rewarding failure? This is like golden parachutes for Chainsaw Dunlap, Michael Milken, Carly Fiorina and all the other toxic CEOs that have killed their companies. How about a Nobel for that black chap who just lost two billion for his financial firm? What about good ol' Nick Leeson? Let's see how fast we can crash the system with perverse incentives! OK, let's look at the ridiculosities that 'earned' these guys halfamill from the dopey arms-financed Swedes -]
    ...Mr. Sargent..."rational expectations theory"...central banks "can't permanently lower unemployment by easing monetary policy...because people will (rationally) anticipate higher future inflation and will (strategically) insist on higher wages for their labour and higher interest rates for their capital."
    [Oh that would really work today! Just watch what happens to these out-of-touch Air Canada employees who are trying to "insist on higher wages," and the whole reason we're in a non-recovery is that investors are "insisting on higher interest rates for their capital" and holding off till they get them. Casselman & Lahart have the obtuseness to remark -]
    That work has significant implications now, as central banks around the world grapple with how to boost struggling economies without sparking runaway inflation in the future...
    [Actually, that work is totally irrelevant now as central banks around the world have already lowered interest rates to near zero and far from "sparking runaway inflation," they have merely killed any incentive to risk their huge cached cash by actually investing it and "getting it back to work creating jobs" - and earnings - and spending - and boosting marketable productivity and incentivated investing. Basically we need smarter, more critical financial reporters than these two gulls, and smarter more up-to-date economic Nobelists than these two dinosaurs, and a smarter, less safe-decision-taking Nobel Prize committee. Here's the other guy's "$500K contribution" -]
    ...Mr. Sims...methods...to tease statistical relationships out of reams of data...
    [Apparently he hasn't "teased" any relationships that kept us out of a diagonally downward spiral.]
    ...Mr. Sims showed how vector autoregressions...could be used to studying [sic] changes in the economy...
    [Show us the jobs. Or if you're only interested in sustainable (nevermind profitable) investments, show us the sustainable (nevermind profitable) investments. In other words, Sims work is only about a bunch of overgrown little boys getting off on irrelevant game playing, and for the Nobel Committee, it's another case of maximum investment at points of minimum return = "more money than sense." If this was -]
    ...a major advance in macroeconomics...
    [- it's a testimonial to the irrelevance, the methodology-rich results-poor character of current macroeconomics. Mainstream economists today have missed the boat and embarrassed themselves further by ridiculing the boat with their flawful "lump of labor" sneer.]
    Mr. Sims said Monday that he didn't know how to solve the world's economic problems, but that he thinks the techniques he and Mr. Sargent developed "are central to getting us out of this mess."
    [We think their techniques are irrelevant to anything but economists fiddling while Rome burns. Fruitful techniques would be techniques from linguistics that help you think outside the box, such as gap-in-paradigm completion and Chomsky's better-of-two-grammars selection. Also, Robert Updegraf's tricks for sseeing the obvious and Bucky Fuller's design-science pointers.]
    The two economists will share a total prize of...$1.5 million.... Mr. Sims said he would be keep [sic] the prize money in cash "for a while" and think about what he would do with it.
    [How about building a nuke-proof, quake-proof shelter under the Rocky Mtns with a 25-year stock of spam & creamed spinach to survive the mess that developed while these idiot savants rearranged the deckchairs within their unsinkable economic hull. Evidently, questions like, how do you get growth (upsizing) by downsizing, and what happens when you get higher technology without lower workweeks or more worksavings without workspreading, never occurred to them - and still hasn't.]
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. US Steel and workers reach tentative agreement, Toronto Star via thestar.com
    HAMILTON, Ont., Canada - ...The deal also guaranteed employees 26 weeks of work at 32 hours a week. - see whole article under today's date.
  2. Think like a Beaver: A deal for families, VancouverSun.com
    VANCOUVER, B.C., Canada - ...With new incentives, employers would reduce the work week by three to five hours for the half of men and the one-third of women who now work more than 40 hours/week... - see whole article under today's date.
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Sun-Mon, October 9-10, 2011 while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think there has been a real recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - headlines today fm Globe Mags, 57 William, Bytown Mkt; updating from Café Corsé, 152 Montcalm, Îsle de Hull, QUÉBEC -

    growth-choking DOWNSIZING in the news (archives) - all reversible by switching to timesizing -

  • Canada: Army to cut 250 civilian positions - Reduction a prelude to wider cuts at Defense Dept., 10/10 Ottawa Citizen, A1.

    tsunami of BANKRUPTCIES & CLOSINGS (archives) - staunched only by risky war or safe timesizing -
  • Euro debt crisis claims first bank casualty - Governments step in to save Dexia SA as Merkel and Sarkozy agree on a strategy to bolster Europe's financial institutions, 10/10 Toronto Globe, B1.
    [It is NOT a government responsibility to bolster financial institutions.]

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • Secret U.S. memo made legal case to kill [= murder/assassinate, under Obama administration, US-born Anwar al-Awlaki, a U.S.] citizen - Qaeda leader in Yemen, 10/09 NYT, A1.
    ["Black Bush" does it again!]
  • The Depression: If only things were that good, by David Leonhardt, 10/09 NYT, SR1.
    ...The most worrisome aspect about our current slump is that it combines obvious short-term problems - from the financial crisis - with less obvious long-term problems. Those long-term problems include a decade-long slowdown in new-business formation, the stagnation of educational gains [?] and the rapid growth of industries with mixed blessings, including finance and health care [??].
    [And he doesn't even mention the biggest long-term problem = the constant substitution of work-saving technology for employee-consumers in the production and provision of more and more urgently demand products and services - into a context of at worst, an unregulated workweek, and at best, a workweek frozen at the pre-computer level of 1940, after a hundred years during which it was cut in half (1840: over 80 hrs/wk; 1940: 40 hrs/wk).]
    Together, these problems raise the possibility that the United States is not merely suffering through a normal, if severe, downturn. Instead, it may have entered a phase in which high unemployment [and low earning and spending and investing] is the norm....
    [Unless we centrifuge the black hole of spending power crushed into and deactivated in the top tiny fraction of businesses and citizens by engineering a shortage of labor, harnessing market forces to raise pay and spending, and drop the myth that you can redistribute any percentage however large of the money supply to any percentage however small of the population and have a growing, or even a functioning, economy.]
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. W.Va. has options for economic growth ... seriously, 10/10 The Charleston Gazette (WV) via InsuranceNewsNet.com
    Charleston, W.Va. - ...Here's my short list \of\ things the state could do [for] more resilience: For starters, we could reform our unemployment system by allowing the option of work-sharing. This would give employers the option of cutting hours rather than laying off workers in hard times, with the state making up some of the lost wages with unemployment funds. This is a win/win for workers and employers. Long-term unemployment can have devastating impacts on the mental and physical health of workers and the well being of their families and communities. The state as a whole suffers economically when people drop out of the labor force, which has been and remains a major drag on West Virginia's growth. But keeping skilled workers also helps employers, and is particularly popular with manufacturers. As Kevin Hassett of the conservative American Enterprise Institute noted in 2009, "When a recession strikes, firms are faced with a dilemma: Sales and profits are down, and many workers are idle. But finding skilled workers is costly and time-consuming, involving large fixed costs. If a firm fires workers, it may incur large hiring and training costs when the recession ends and sales turn back up. Thus, a firm would prefer, all else equal, to hoard labor during a recession."... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. Rome DMV avoids shut down in 2012 budget, 10/10 YNN via centralny.ynn.com
    ROME, N.Y. - Longer lines and shorter hours may be in its future, but the Rome DMV will not close as a result of Oneida County's proposed 2012 budget... - see whole article under today's date.
  3. State suffers from bad law, 10/09 Daily Home Online via dailyhome.com
    LITTLE ROCK, Ala. - ...A reasonable person might assume that with state budgets cut to the bone, courthouse offices being closed around the state, and workers being laid off or furloughed in many government departments, lawmakers would resist adding to the bureaucratic workload and would look for ways to improve efficiency in government operations... - see whole article under today's date.
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Saturday, October 8, 2011 while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think there has been a real recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - headlines today fm Globe Mags, 57 William, Bytown Mkt; updating from Café Corsé, 152 Montcalm, Îsle de Hull, QUÉBEC -

    growth-choking DOWNSIZING in the news (archives) - all reversible by switching to timesizing -

  • 672 school layoffs take effect, New York Times, A1 pointer to A14.
    The loss of jobs represents the largest number of single-agency layoffs under Mayor Michael Bloomberg.

    MAKEWORK: too little, too late, too wasteful, too artificial, too military, too eco-stressing, in the news (archives) - all unnecessary with full employment via emergency worksharing & permanent timesizing -
  • Nation-building at home, letter to editor by Jack E. Cohen of Hewlett NY, NYT, A16.
    Re "Foreign aid faces major cutbacks in budget crisis" (10/04/2011 NYT, A1), we've already passed through 100 years of almost unending conflict, not counting the 19th century. Isn't it time to stay home and rebuild our own nation [with something besides military industries!]? Fighting in Afghanistan will never get us anywhere.
    Afghans never asked for us. Why are we trying to alter their system of government?...
    It is time to defend the USA here in the USA, not in Afghanistan. Our Constitution did not declare that we must be masters of the world, so why keep on trying?

    tsunami of BANKRUPTCIES & CLOSINGS (archives) - staunched only by risky war or safe timesizing -
  • More than the mail - Where the Post Office is the town's heart, fears of closings, NYT, B1.
    [...Happening all over America.]

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • Economy adds jobs, but not enough - Employers hired 103,000 workers in September, tamping recession fears [LOL]; Unemployment still 9.1%, Wall Street Journal, A1.
    [Here's the New York Times' frontpage valium, editorial alarm -]
    Modest growth in jobs tempers fears - Jobless rate is steady - 14 million out of work but the economy is not weakening [for whom & who says?], NYT, A1.
    More bleak job numbers - It is becoming increasingly impossible to undo the damage from years of high unemployment, editorial, NYT, A16.
  • U.S. stocks fell, but ended up for the week - The Dow slipped 20.21 points or 0.2% to 11103.12 on Friday as European debt worries overshadowed the U.S. jobs reading [which wasn't great anyway], WSJ, A1 pointer to B4.
  • The Toronto Exchange tumbles, Presse Canadienne via La Presse de Montréal, PA11.
    ...closed yesterday's session on a drop of nearly 200 points, despite the publication of encouraging[?] data on the creation of jobs in Canada and United States[?]...
  • If it looks like a bear..., by Jason Zweig, WSJ, B1.
    [If it looks like a bear, QUICK, CALL IT A BULL!]
  • Revenge of the gougers - That $5 monthly fee to use your [BofA] debit card may be just the start,
    op ed by Joe Nocera, A17.
  • Unintended consequences from QE gone wild, WSJ, B16.
    ...the Bank of England's new GBP75 billion ($116B) quantitative-easing [QE] program and a gloomy economic outlook will likely push UK government bond yields lower...
  • Spain and Italy "suffered" [our quotes] debt downgrades, triggering a drop in the euro - Belgium was placed under review for a possible downgrade, WSJ, A1 pointer to A11.
    [Not even Belgium, the center of the EU, "gets it." Wouldn't it be nice to hear about the countries that have a clue for a change?!]
  • On the radar - Uncertainty will be with us longer,
    per Hexavest's Jean-Rení Adam, interviewed by Richard Dufour, La Presse de Montréal, PA7.
    [Or the certainty of further deterioration - if we can break our addiction to happytalk.]
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Microchip's Savvy Game Plan - The semiconductor company has managed adversity smartly in the past, and is well equipped to handle another recession - The stock is cheap, the dividend rich, by Jaccqueline Doherty, Barron's via barrons.com
    NEW YORK, N.Y. - ...With factory production cut by a third, the manufacturing staff was divided in thirds, with one-third furloughed every week. Microchip raised funds for employees in need. It took donations from employees and the company contributed $60000 to the fund... - see more of article under today's date.
  2. Modesto teachers protest on furloughs, Modesto Bee
    MODESTO, Calif. - ...About two dozen members of the Modesto Teachers Association used the furlough day to remind people driving along Coffee Road that Friday was one of five days Modesto City Schools students aren't being taught... - see whole article under today's date.
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Friday, October 7, 2011 while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think there has been a real recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - updating today from Café Corsé (7am-11pm), 152 rue Montcalm, Gatineau/Hull, QUÉBEC -

    vanishing RETIREMENT in the news (archives) - no problem with short-time full employment via timesizing -

  • Pension funds take hit in third quarter, Toronto Globe, B3.

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • Steve Jobs 1955-2011 - Apple's innovator recalled as driven, dynamic, difficult, by Blackwell & Trichur & Erman, Toronto Globe, B7.
    [Now that we're drowning in eulogies, let's, from the viewpoint of worktime economics, take a look at The Rest of the Story -]
    ...As president of Apple Canada [in the mid-1980s], Dave Killins had a ringside seat experiencing the intensity of founder Steve Jobs.... Mr. Jobs thought his work[aholic] ethic should be emulated by everyone else in the company, said Mr. Killin.... At headquarters in Cupertino CA and in other offices, "it was expected that the parking lots of the buildings woud be filled on a Sunday afternoon," despite the fact that was hard on family life and ruined many marriages...."
    [And killed Jobs at the age of only 56, and killed jobs while he was forcing everyone to do more than one. Well, at least now whenever we read about JOBS, we can assume it's the plural of "job" and not find out it's somebody who wanted each of his employees to do more jobs than one.]
  • Is The Jobs Picture A Monet Or A Picasso? by Jonathan Chen, SeekingAlpha.com
    The September Non-farm Payroll report was released earlier this morning and while it was better than expected, the closer you get to it, the uglier it gets...
  • Wall Street protest grows, Epoch Times, photo caption, A1.
    "Wall St. gambles and the 99% pay" = sign held by man on steps of Federal Courthouse in Foley Sq. NYC on Oct.5.
  • Young, educated and unemployed - Today's graduates [say] they went to school, volunteered and pounded the pavement - So why can't they find work?, Toronto Star, B1.
    [Well, let's see. There's the frozen pre-automation workweek. And downsizings and outsourcings. And then there's -]
  • Work force mobility - Immigration undergoes a sea change, by Chrystia Freeland, Thomson Reuters Digital via Toronto Globe, B2.
    Immigration is always a hot issue when an economy is weak and jobs are scarce, so...it has jumped to the top[?] of the political agenda in Europe and the United States.... Wang Huiyao, founder and president of the Beijing-based Center for China and Globalization [said,] "We had the globalization of trade [which is now coming undone cuz it's too great a sacrifice of national discipline and fine-tuning], we had the globalization or capital [which is now coming undone cuz it's too great a sacrifice of national discipline and fine-tuning], and now we have the globalization of talent [or just of desperation - boatloads of desperate people].
    [More likely we now have the deglobalization of capital and trade. Of course, China has everything to gain, temporarily, by finishing off the remains of everyone else's industrial sectors and population stability....]
  • Canada's wealthiest down billions in 2011, Canadian Press via Ottawa Metro, p.19.
    [An ebbing tide strands all boats. The wealthy have a bigger percentage of the money supply but it's worth less, because there's less marketable productivity to serve as sustainable (let alone profitable) investment targets. Renting it out (lending) brings less cuz interest rates are virtually nil. So there's no incentive to invest it anyway. So it deactivates, the currency decelerates, and the economy shrinks.]
    For once it wasn't a case of the rich getting richer. According to the latest edition of "Canadian Business" magazine, many of Canada's wealthiest have actually seen their fortunes shrink in the past year. ...The perennial top finisher [is] Toronto's Thomson family, whose wealth shrank an estimated 8.7% from 2010. "Canadian Business" estimates the Thomson family fortune currently stands at $21.34 billion from last year....
    [But at these levels, who cares? It doesn't change a thing for the tiny number of people involved. They certainly don't change their spending habits, and their spending remains a nanofraction of their money. They are the root and source of the diminished spending characteristic of recessions and depressions, but they also own the media so they'll be the last to be fingered.]
  • Canada - Building permits sluggist, Ottawa Metro, p.19.
    The value of building permits issued in August slipped for the second month, weighed down [10.4% to $5.9B] by a sluggish commercial sector and worries over weak economic recovery [if any]....
  • European Central Bank moves to keep cash flowing to ailing banks, Toronto Globe, B1.
    [Good money after bad.]
  • China games the trading system with weak yuan, Obama says, Toronto Globe, B6.
    [So redesign the trading system and STOP PREACHING!]
  • The U.S. threatens to cut all financing [for UN if Palestinian cause continues to flourish at UNESCO], Le Journal de Montreal, p.43.
    [Good. The self-bankrupting mega-hasbeen-cum-bigbaby continues to have tantrums and cut its international creds and influence - and its own bigdumb throat. It's sacrificing its own founding principles of independent nationhood for a nasty paranoid radical group within its little nuked-up mideast pitbull, Israel, a group that is a disgrace to its own religion - compare, "Let justice roll down like waters, and righteousness like an everflowing stream" from the ancient Hebrew prophet Amos. Israel is treating its closest neighbors the way Jews throughout the centuries did NOT want their neighbors to treat them. And Bam doesn't have the guts to drop the billions in charity forced out of American taxpayers every year for this nasty little pitbull regardless of how high the national deficit and debt that taxpayers' "representatives" have saddled them with. Notice we hear daily about cutting Medicare and Social Security for all Americans, but we never hear a word about cutting "foreign aid" to this hostile land-thieving belligerent racist nuclear-armed paranoid little Frankenstate. A minority of sickos led by a yahoo who should be netted are soiling and spoiling the Jewish homeland. What was it all for?]
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Solon 'curbs' production output in Germany, PV-Tech.org
    BERLIN, Germany - Struggling PV module manufacturer, Solon [SE, LLC] is reacting to the weak end-user demand in Germany by reducing module output and plans to introduce short-time working to reduce inventory levels... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. House Oversight and Government Reform Subcommittee on Health Care, District of Columbia, Census, and the National Archives Hearing, InsuranceNewsNet.com
    WASHINGTON, D.C. - ...In general, a "full-time employee" is an employee who works an average of at least 30 hours per week.
    [That'll be big news for a lot of Americans!]
    If full-time employee status is determined on a monthly basis, an employee who works more than 30 hours per week for only one month would be considered a "full-time employee" who triggers employer responsibility for that month... - see whole article under today's date.
  3. BONUS - People Would Could Only Get Part-Time Jobs Increased 5.03% in September 2011, Submitted by Robert Oak, EconomicPopulist.org
    WASHINGTON, D.C. - September's unemployment report is worse than the 58,000, sans striking Verizon workers, job growth. People being forced into part-time jobs skyrocketed by 444,000 in a month, to a tally of 9,270,000 people. That's a 5.03% monthly jump and the second month in a row for skyrocketing part-timers who need and want full-time jobs. Last month had a 5.12% increase in forced part-time. That's a whopping 6.62% of total employed people stuck in part-time jobs because that's all they could get. People in part-time jobs due to slack work conditions increased 130,000, or 2.23%. Slack business conditions cause employers to cut hours of their employees. People who could only get a part-time job but want and need full time, increased by 116,000, which is a 4.24% monthly increase.
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Thursday, October 6, 2011 while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think there has been a real recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - updating today from Café Corsé (7am-11pm), 152 rue Montcalm, Gatineau/Hull, QUÉBEC -

    growth-choking DOWNSIZING in the news (archives) - all reversible by switching to timesizing -

  • Police chief [Toronto's] ordered to cut jobs - Defiant Bill Blair given a week to slash 10% from budget, Toronto Star, A1.
    ...650 police...270 civilians...

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • Market turmoil worse than 2008, writer says, Ottawa Citizen, D1.
    ...Nassim Nicholas Taleb...because countries have larger sovereign-debt loads...
  • Protesters literally sick of being left out, Toronto Star, B1.
    [left out of health insurance?]
  • U.S. hangs onto fragile recovery, National Post, FP1.
    [No it doesn't. It just hangs onto rosier, sublter-doctored, less relevant indexes.]
  • Clouds darken for airlines - Airline stocks are falling as investors note weakening consumer confidence and declining cargo shipments, Toronto Globe, B1.
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. One Good Idea in Obama's American Jobs Act, Forbes.com
    WASHINGTON, D.C. - ...The impetus for the [new type of] unemployment insurance program [trying hard to avoid the term "worksharing"] came in the 1990s as a demonstration project in the bright-blue state of Oregon, where it worked very well. In 2003, then-Georgia Labor Commissioner Michael Thurmond, a Democrat, launched Georgia Works, a variation of the Oregon plan. Since then states as diverse as Texas, New Hampshire, Utah and Nevada have implemented their own versions. The basic idea is to turn a worker’s unemployment benefits—which usually last for 25 weeks, but have been extended to 99 weeks in 21 states with especially high unemployment—into “reemployment” benefits: providing income while being trained in a new job... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. Workers may get furlough pay back, WTSP 10 News via wtsp.com
    PALM BAY, Fla. - ...All city employees furloughed in 2009 would have two days added into their leave banks under a proposal that goes to Palm Bay City Council tonght. The proposal comes weeks after an arbitrator ruled Palm Bay did not have the right to impose the unpaid time off under a contract with the local chapter of the National Association of Government Employees, the union that covers the city's blue collar workers. But instead of returning the time to just a select group, City Manager Sue Hann is recommending the city council reinstate the time for all employees, to be fair... - see whole article under today's date.
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Wednesday, October 5, 2011 while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think there has been a real recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - updating today from Café Corsé (7am-11pm), 152 rue Montcalm, Gatineau/Hull, QUÉBEC -

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -

  • Grim signs that bottom is nearing - But...'still early to stimulate economy', Toronto Star, B1.
    [Only simpletons believe there was an act-of-God top and there's an act-of-God bottom. Until we reverse the upward redistribution of the money supply to the hoards of uncirculating corporate and individual cash, there's no bottom in sight -]
  • $2-trillion: Size of U.S. companies' cash cushion against recession, Toronto Globe, A1 pointer to B16.
    [This ain't no cushion against recession - it's the primary CAUSE of recession! And the most market-oriented adn flexible way to fix it is to simulalte wartime levels of labor shortage and harness market forces in flexibly raising wages and consumer spending. How, without war? Trim the workweek and convert overtime into job.]
  • Debt crisis reached a head - Markets roiled as European banking meltdown widens, National Post, A1.
    [There is no necessary 'head' as long as corrupt bankers remain unquarantined.]
  • Occupy Toronto grassroots movement mad as ... well ..., Toronto Star, A1.
    [Oh those polite Canadians!]
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Lawmakers may mull work sharing, Fort Wayne Journal Gazette
    INDIANAPOLIS, Ind. - ...Twenty-one states and the District of Columbia have a work-sharing program. Delaney explained the theory to the committee members – a mix of legislators, businessmen and labor representative – by giving an example of an employer with four employees working a collective 160 hours of work. When the workload drops to only about 120 hours, the employer could reduce everyone’s hours to 30 hours a week rather than laying off one person completely. The employees would get a small amount of unemployment and keep their benefits... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. Trade unions press working hours regulation, by Fan Feifei (HK Edition), ChinaDaily,com.cn
    HONG KONG, China - Trade unions are calling on the government to set out a schedule for introducing legislation on standard working hours for people who work in catering, hotels, care, nursing, building management, security, and retail sales. Second quarter figures by the Census and Statistics Dept. of the government show there are 1.89 million employees working more than 44 hours a week, accounting for more than 50% of the 3.61 million employees in the city. Figures also show about 620,000 employees work more than 60 hours a week, accounting for 20% of the working population... - see whole article under today's date.
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Tuesday, October 4, 2011 while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think there has been a real recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - updating today from Café Corsé (7am-11pm), 152 rue Montcalm, Gatineau/Hull, QUÉBEC -

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -

  • Market nears bear territory - U.S. stocks down almost 17% since April high on Europe, economic concerns,
    Wall Street Journal, A1.
  • Global economic turmoil - Manufacturing slows worldwide -...- Financial shares lead the 258.08-point U.S. market rout,
    WSJ, A1 pointer to C4.
  • Foreign aid faces major cutbacks in budget crisis - Both parties raise ax - Blow to U.S. influence in age of world trauma and instability, NYT, A1.
    [Much of which the U.S. created - hey, wait a minute, this is actually Good News - the rest of the world gets a rest from the Great Meddler - and taxpayers get a break from all the forced "charity" dba bribery and dictator-propping.]
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Budget woes force Delaware Co. to cut work week, Indianapolis Star via indystar.com
    MUNCIE, Ind. -- ...The County Council voted last week to cut three hours from the work week of employees who don't work for emergency services or the courts... The council decided to spread the 32-hour work week for the employees over four days..\.. Commissioner Donald Dunnuck says the county's "dire times" forced the decision... - see whole article under today's date.
    [So is there a Mickey Munnouse in Muncie to costar with Donald Dunnuck?
    "Oh the Wellth Fargo wagon itha...comin' down the thtreet -
    oh pleath let it be fer me! ...
    In MUNthie indiana, munthie INdiana, munthie indiAna, my HOME thweet HOOOOME!"
    From classic musical, The Music Man, starring Robert Preston - oops, it's Gary Indiana ... nevermind
    (Muncie woulda been more fun!)]
  2. Utica faces retire-rehire questions. by Alan Reed, MountVernonNews.com
    UTICA, Ohio — Should a public employee be allowed to retire, collect his retirement benefits, and be rehired in the same position? That question was placed in the hands of Utica Village Council and its Light Committee Monday evening. The committee received a report from Mayor Larry Friesel outlining the savings the village would realize if Village Administrator Jud Brechler retires from the full-time position and then was rehired as a part-time administrator (30 hours per week)... - see whole article under today's date.
  3. Ming Pao workers camp out for better jobs, TorontoObserver.ca
    TORONTO, Ont., Canada - ...Holding signs outside the Chinese daily newspaper’s office near Brimley Rd. and Huntingwood Dr., the workers are demanding job security, better wages, shorter working hours and more vacation days... - see whole article under today's date.
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Sun-Mon, October 2-3, 2011 while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think there has been a real recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - headlines in Cambridge, Mass. provided by *Porter Sq. Books - "One square above Harvard!" -

    looting- and layoff-triggering MERGERS in the news (archives) -
    Mergers&acquisitions (M&As) provide a last resort for incompetent CEOs & a highway to monopoly - Management's
    economy-shrinking merger skills need replacement by economy-growing workspreading skills -
    Buy instead of build market share? See 'overlap' & lay off more of your customers' customers? = a suicidal joke - Real CEOs don't do 'M&As' -

  • Another small bank is disappearing, with Economy Co-operative's lone branch in Merrimac NH soon to be taken over [by Haverhill Bank], 10/02 Boston Globe, A1 pointer to G1.

    MAKEWORK: too little, too late, too wasteful, too artificial, too military, too eco-stressing, in the news (archives) - all unnecessary with full employment via emergency worksharing & permanent timesizing -
  • Despite [state] funding, start-up clusters outside of Boston find rocky soil - tough going..., by Scott Kirsner kirsner@pobox.com, 10/02 Boston Globe, G1,G4.
    ...The Massachusetts Medical Device Development Center ["M2D2" incubator for start-ups in Lowell leached or, our quotes] "attracted" about $4.5 million in state funding,
    [= forced charity for small%-spending wealthy from big%-spending taxpayers based on The Great Jobs Excuse, which Timesizing exterminates...]
    and the 22,000-square-foot bio-manufacturing center [UMass-Dartmouth Bio-Manufacturing Center, a planned $23 million facility to help companies do small-scale production tests for new biotech drugs, leached or, our quotes] "drew" nearly $50m.
    All around the Commonwealth [of Massachusetts], there are efforts to support new business clusters, whether fostering marine technology start-ups near the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute or attracting clean-tech companies to a two-year-old incubator in Lynn.... Planting seeds in places like Lowell and Fall River using taxpayer money is the easy part of cluster creation [when it should be impossible to divert taxpayer money into the private sector and to the wealthy]. But the necessary fertilizer is something money can't buy....
    [Sure it can - when left in the many pockets of higher%-spending taxpayers instead of being stuffed into the few pockets of the lower%-spending wealthy.]

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • Stocks end gloomy quarter on weak note, 10/02 Boston Globe, G5.
    The worst quarter for the stock market since the financial crisis ended on a down note, though the Dow closed up for the week. Stocks fell broadly Friday on fresh signs that Europe's debt problems [never mind ours] linger and the US economy continues to languish [ie: decline]. The major indexes each lost more than 12% this Q, the first time that's happened since the end of 2008.
    [Well, it's going to happen a lot more, because the nation's money supply is still concentrating and coagulating, without limit, in a tinier and tinier slice of the population, who were already spending all they cared to before they got the last $20 million - which they weren't particularly aware they got because it's a trifle to them.
    What prevented this during World Wars I and II? Labor shortage. It got employers bidding against one another for good help. On one hand that leached money out of the richest slice of the population, and on the other hand it redirected the national revenue from funneling up to them to spreading out to the hundreds of millions who really wanted and needed to spend it, which increased consumer markets and all dependent markets (ie: all other markets), boosted marketable productivity (not just productivity to sit on shelves) and sustainable investment (which depends on marketable productivity). "The rising tide lifted all boats" including the wealthy's. How to get this magic labor shortage without war? CUT THE WORKWEEK and convert overtime into jobs.]
  • Beware of stock-market rallies ahead,
    by Kelly Evans, WSJ, C1.
  • Spooked investors seek safety - Volatile quarter leaves markets' victims [poor wealthy babies!] wondering what's next; No bad news may be good news, 10/03 Wall Street Journal, C1.
    [Or since it's October as in The Crash of '29, what's next may be Black Thursday, Black Friday and Black Monday. Stock crashes are the only things that penetrate the thick self-cushioning and self-happytalking of the wealthy and indicate that, goshohgee, maybe there's possibly a real problem here somewhere...]
    Cartoon: 60s-hairstyle woman gasping:
    The Dow sank 12%!
    The U.S. lost a triple-A rating!
    Who will fix Europe?
    $71 billion yanked from U.S. stock mutual funds!
    I WANT Treasuries!
    [but then come moronic Republicans to "starve the beast", bankrupt the government, crap out the greenback and wipe out the Treasuries...]
  • Inside... - Uncommon knowledge - ...only the unequal survive, and other surprising insights from the social sciences, 10/02 BG, K1 pointer to K12.
    [This mislead is not the counter-intuitive pronouncement it pretends. It's only an argument against equalization on a point, not equalization on a range like timesizing whose bottom line (definition of underemployment) is set by referendum and whose top line (definition of overtime) is set incrementally by its bottom line (target unemployment). Also, this tiny article is based on primitive tribes and assumes an evolutionary advantage to spreading into an uncrowded habitat. It does not work in a crowded habitat, like Easter Island or Earth's entire biosphere in the context of exponentiating human population over, say, 6-7 billion.]
  • Darwin, the economist - We're wrong about how competition works, says Prof. Robert H. Frank [of Cornell Economics, no relation to Jesus H. Christ but nice try], interview by Christopher Dreher, BG, K3.
    [Frank trashes his own credibility by citing Milton Friedman's self-contradicting proposal for a progressive consumption tax back in World War II. Friedman famously said you increase what you subsidize, decrease what you tax, and here he was, proposing taxing and decreasing consumer spending during the precise period when rising consumer spending was finally ending the Great Depression and restoring economic growth, something we could use today.]
  • Economic standoff - The biggest threat to recovery? A policy mistake -,
    [Now there's a valuable contribution to science! We'd say the biggest threat is obscure economists at obscure companies trying to get free publicity by cluttering the media with banalities. Oops, here's another one -]
    - A fragile recovery is much less able [than what, a strong recovery?] to withstand a shock - even a weak one [weak what, shock?], by chief economist Nariman Behravesh of IHS Inc. [again, no relation to IHSOUS NAZARENOS], 10/02 BG, K10.
    [Basically we have yet another conventional liberal economist who's too superficial to avoid contradictions like -]
    ...This is about the worst possible time to be cutting spending or raising taxes...
    [so we're supposed to keep adding to our exponentiating trillion-dollar annual deficit? what a nitwit! And he's too chicken to utter the obvious = sooner or later we're going to raise taxes on the wealthy cuz that's the only unused megacache available that isn't being spent anyway and can be taxed with no adverse effects, only positive effects as government does their spending for them. And he's too brainwashed to target the GOP - he lets us assume the Dems are just as obstructive -]
    ...The third \thing\ required of our politicians in these trying times...is to act like rational grownups...
    [- this at a time when the childishness of Republicans is so entrenched that everyone with half a brain is screaming at Bam to QUIT acting like a rational grownup cuz the GOP is crying out for a good hard spanking with twice as many excercisings of Executive Privilege as baby Bush used to dig America INTO the Lost Decade.]
  • Foreclosures are killing us,
    op ed by Craig Pollack & Julia Lynch, 10/03 New York Times, A21.
  • An anti-Wall Street protest in New York entered its third week with hundreds of arrests for blocking traffic,
    10/03 WSJ, A1 pointer to A6.
  • Economic protest gains steam in Hub [=Boston MA] - Aims to highlight plight of struggling Americans,
    by Maria Sacchetti, 10/03 Boston Globe, A1.
    ...The group, called Occupy Boston, is inspired by Occupy Wall Street, a demonstration entering its third week in Manhattan's Financial District that led to the arrest of 700 people Saturday on charges of blocking the Brooklyn Bridge. The effort has spread to several communities nationwide, with tens of thousands of people participating. In Boston, the protests on Friday swelled to about 1,000 in Dewey Square. Police arrested 24 people on trepassing charges when they refused to leave the Bank of America building nearby.
    [Finally, the Me Generation is history and the nondescript X and Y Generations are over, as young Americans finally wake up to the depth and speed of national deterioration and the insulation and irrelevance-cum-destructiveness of entrenched national "leadership" of whatever stripe. They have yet to realize that unexpected "thin edge of the wedge" is the frozen and unenforced 1940 workweek cap and the failure to automatically transform overtime and overwork into jobs and (wherever needed) training.]
    But the demonstration, largely fueled by social media, has generally been a peaceful attempt to call attention to the "bottom 99 percent" of Americans....
  • Massachusetts Comprehensive Assessment System [for schools] inequality - Poverty is cause of achievement gap, letter to editor by Joseph Rukeyser of Rockport MA, 10/02 Boston Globe, K8.
    ...Let us face the simple fact that income is tied to every indicator of the health and future of a community and its children...
    [See MCAS story in Economic Decline section of 9/25/2011.]
  • Shoppers forgoing loyalty for deals - ...Coupon use grows..., 10/03 BG, B6.
    [And so does poverty and desperation...]
  • Greece to miss deficit targets set by world lenders, 10/03 BG, B6.
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. State Rep. Jim Ananich pushes legislation for work-sharing program, 10/02 MLive.com
    FLINT, Mich. — State Rep. Jim Ananich is pushing legislation to allow Michigan to participate in a potential national work-sharing program. Work-sharing programs allow businesses to reduce the number of hours their employees work without forcing layoffs. The workers are able to make up their pay with money from a work-sharing fund [or the (un)employment insurance fund which is saving money from fewer layoffs]. The concept has been tossed around by the federal government and could help decrease the number of unemployed, said Ananich, a Democrat who represents Flint... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. Work-Sharing provisions of Obama Jobs Plan play stabilizing role in state labor market, 10/03 The Progressive Pulse via pulse.ncpolicywatch.org
    RALEIGH, N.C. - ...Take for example, a firm with three employees each working 40 hours a week for a total of 120 hours a week for the firm. During an economic downturn, the firm would normally lay off one worker to reduce payrolls to 90 hours a week [and next downturn, one more, and...]. Under the work-share program, the firm would simply allow each employee to work fewer hours (say 30 hours a week), thus negating the need for layoffs... According to a recent OECD paper, work-sharing programs in Germany, Italy, and Japan during the recession reduced the drop in employment from 2008 to 2009 by 0.5-1.0%—evidence of the effective role played by these programs in a broad portfolio of job creation strategies... If done right, a North Carolina work-sharing program could go a long way to ensuring short relief to workers and employers alike while promoting greater long-term stability in the labor market. - see whole article under today's date.
  3. Obama's Reform Of Unemployment Benefits Right For L.A., Expert Says, 10/02 NeonTommy.com
    LOS ANGELES, Calif. - ...“Work-sharing, reemployment assistance and startup assistance could certainly be very effective in getting people back to work in Los Angeles,” said Elaine Bell Kaplan, a professor of American sociology at the University of Southern California. “I think work-sharing is great because it would allow companies to keep employees at fewer hours while allowing them to continue collecting some unemployment benefits.”... - see whole article under today's date.
  4. Eight-hour workweek, 10/03 FrederickNewsPost.com (subscription)
    FREDERICK, Maryld. - ...At the time, 2005, the delegation voted to boost commissioners' annual salary from $30,000 to $45,000... Nice work if you can get it, especially now we have the benefit of hindsight from atop the ruins of the economy and a countywide jobless rate of 6.3% (and a national rate of 9.1%). We're sure plenty of county residents would love to make $45,000 a year, and would be glad to put in 40 hours or more a week to get it... So, here's our suggestion: Have commissioners work one day a week, a mere eight hours. We, the taxpayers, will pay you that $173 a day, or about $9,000 a year (260 workdays calculated across 52 weeks). That'll save the county government more than $36,000 per commissioner -- enough to add a roads worker or inspector, maybe even go toward a teacher... - see whole article under today's date.
  5. Tube [subway] drivers' salaries will soar to £50,000... but they'll still work just 35 hours a week, 10/03 DailyMail.co.uk
    LONDON, England - Tube drivers will earn £50,000 salaries despite never working more than 35 hours a week, under a lucrative new pay deal. Some London Underground workers will receive £10,000 pay rises over four years in what unions have called 'the best offer in the public sector'.... - see whole article under today's date.
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Saturday, October 1, 2011 while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think there has been a real recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - headlines in Cambridge, Mass. provided by *Porter Sq. Books - "One square above Harvard!" -

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -

  • Stocks log worst quarter since '09 - Dow swoons 12% in period amid global economic turmoil, WSJ, A1:2 target.
    ...The DJIA shed 240.60 points or 2.16% to 10913.38, Wall Street Journal, A1:1 pointer to A1:2,B1,B5.
    The loss capped [not necessarily!] a 12% third-quarter decline, the biggest percentage drop since the first quarter of 2009. Corn and wheat prices fell more than 6%.
    [No jobs, no wages, no consumers, no foundation markets. We're being forced to do the intelligent things we should have been doing since 1933 = fluctuating adjustment (mostly downward) of the workweek against unemployment and overtime-to-jobs conversion. But meanwhile, the suicidal policies go on -]
  • Rewarding CEOs who fail,
    New York Times, B1.
  • Lost decade looms over Western insurers, WSJ, B16.
    [Thankyou, Bill Clinton, for repealing our 1938 bulwark against another depression, the Glass-Steagall Banking Act, which kept separate banking, brokerage and insurance. Now the banks have horned in on insurance, the insurers are kaput - and quite a few brokerages too - except for forced charity from taxpayers aka "bailouts" - chapter head: Wall Street Goes Socialist.]
  • Investors spooked by China - Small-stock accounting scandals are breeding deeper fears, WSJ, B1.
    [China is not the answer. China is a sci-fi nightmare.]
  • Searching for economic solutions, letter to the editor from...Jonathan Carey of San Francisco, NYT, A18.
    David Brooks [9/27] states that no single factor is prolonging the current economic crisis. I disagree. Low consumer demand, falling housing prices and consumer debt all have the same effect: consumers aren't spending. Given that consumer spending makes up 70% of our economy, this is the primary problem. [But weakening consumer spending stems from NO JOBS.]
    Other factors cited by Mr. Brooks are not the problem. Businesses are sitting on piles of cash. If consumers were [employed, earning and] spending, businesses would invest, regardless of "lack of confidence" or "regulatory broadness." Consumers can't or won't spend [the wealthy won't - they were already spending all they cared to before they got the last $10m]. Let's focus on [this].
    [Focusing on this problem: during World Wars I and II (as in "wartime prosperity"), we created a labor shortage--employment surplus by sending much of the labor supply overseas and getting them killed. The resulting labor shortage got employers bidding against one another for good help, raised pay for everyone and not just executives, and the national income flew in and spread out to the hundreds of millions who actually needed and wanted to spend it. The rising tide of consumer demand lifted all boats, including the wealthy's, who then had MARKETABLE productivity to provide sustainable investment targets. Lesson: capitalism runs well on a labor shortage, poorly on a labor surplus. Smart way to get labor shortage and higher pay and consumer spending? CUT THE WORKWEEK and convert chronic overtime into jobs.]
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. East Brewton PO to cut hours, BrewtonStandard.com
    EAST BREWTON, Ala. - As post offices across the country shut down to help save the U.S. Postal Service money, East Brewton’s post office has been spared — although its hours will be cut. The post office will be open for business only two hours a day, from 9 to 11 a.m. beginning Oct. 29... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. Colonial Intermediate Unit 20 bus drivers and maintenance workers seeking to unionize, Lehighvalleylive.com
    EASTON, Penn. - ...Over the last year new vague polices have been enacted, drivers hours have been cut and workers now must work 30 hours a week instead of 25 to qualify for health coverage, said Matthew Dees, a bus driver on the union organizing committee... - see whole article under today's date.
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.